The Library Bill of Rights

Over the past 6 weeks, the Faculty at Brookens Library developed a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. 

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

Below you will find each blog post published as a part of this series.

I: Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/the-library-bill-of-rights-week-

II: Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/15/the-library-bill-or-rights-article-ll/

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/the-library-bill-of-rights-article-

IV: Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/the-library-bill-of-rights-article-iv/

V: A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/04/05/the-library-bill-of-rights-article

VI: Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/the-library-bill-of-rights-article-vi/

The Library Bill of Rights exists as an ethical statement – libraries are for the people, all of the people. Inclusion is at the heart of every library and librarians share a common set of principles about their work. During difficult times, it can be easy to forget what we stand for and The Library Bill of Rights acts as a steadfast reminder. In the simplest terms, libraries are inclusive spaces that foster access, preservation, freedom of expression, and community engagement.

Interpretations are often nuanced and incomplete. Over the last 6 weeks we’ve shared our interpretations of The Library Bill of Rights with you and now it’s your turn to join in the conversation. Do you believe that these tenets have stood the test of time? Do you see areas in which the core beliefs of academia and the core beliefs of libraries intersect?

Contact us if you’d like to share your interpretations of The Library Bill of Rights with our readers.

Written By: Nancy Weichert, Clinical Assistant Professor/ Instructional Services Librarian

 

The Library Bill of Rights, Article V

Over a 7 week period, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. 

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

___________________________________________________________________

WEEK 5

Article V.  A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

In many ways, libraries are the great equalizer. No matter your educational background, your age, your beliefs, or any other aspect of your identity, libraries are open to all, so that all may obtain the resources they need. Creating and maintaining diverse collections, providing unfiltered access to the Internet, and making costly subscription-based online resources available is our foundation. But these collections and services would be meaningless if we limited access to select groups of people. For that reason, I find article 5 of the Library Bill of Rights to be the most impactful.

As an academic library serving a campus community, our primary focus is the university’s student, staff, and faculty. But our resources and services are not limited to those populations. Our doors are open to all. Research is not exclusively done by those with access to a college education. Using computers and the internet are more increasingly the only way to participate in certain basic functions of daily life, and information literacy is not a skill just for the classroom, but for life. Serving Springfield and beyond is an important part of our job.

This openness extends beyond serving patrons who are not affiliated with our university, but has a much broader scope. Brookens, like all libraries adhering to the Library Bill of Rights, places no limitations on patrons based on their origin, age, background, or views. Just like we make both sides of the issue available in our collections, we make that collection available to those with beliefs on either side of the issue, as well as those in-between and undecided. Additionally, we make no assumptions about what people of particular groups will want or need when providing resources. Instead, deciding what resources are appropriate or of interest is entirely up to each individual to decide, and they will be able to do so without censorship or judgment.

It is our honor to serve our UIS community as well as the community at-large and our responsibility to continue to advocate for their right to access the information all of our patrons need or desire.

Written By: Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services

Tree Dedication for Jane Treadwell 11/10

Please join us in recognizing the leadership of Jane Treadwell, Dean Emeritus.  The Friends of Brookens Library, along with the library staff, are dedicating a Magnolia tree in appreciation of Treadwell’s nearly 14 years of service to Brookens Library at the University of Illinois Springfield.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

4:00 pm – North East Entrance of Brookens Library

friends-tree-dedication-2016-w

Meet the Dean – Faculty Open House

Please join us for the annual Brookens Library Faculty Open House.

Thursday, September 15, 2016
2:00 – 4:00 pm  –   Brookens Library – Lower Level

This year we are welcoming Pattie Piotrowski to Brookens Library
as the new University Librarian and Dean of Library Instructional Services.

Come meet the Dean, learn about your library, and network with your UIS colleagues.
Your library liaison will be available to answer any questions you might have about instruction, our website, materials requests, and more. We hope to see you there!

faculty-meet-the-dean-fall-2016-copy

 

Jane Treadwell, University Librarian to Retire

Please join us as we celebrate the retirement of Jane Treadwell, University Librarian and Dean of Library Instructional Services.

Dean Treadwell has served the University of Illinois Springfield for nearly 14 years in her role. Help us show her how much we appreciate all she has done for Brookens Library, the University and the Friends of Brookens Library on:

Tuesday, April 26  –  3:00 – 5:00 pm  –  PAC Restaurant – University of Illinois Springfield

 

Treadwell_Retirement Invite

Faculty Library Associate Program

Faculty Library Associate

Brookens Library announces the Summer Faculty Library Associate program for faculty members interested in integrating information literacy and library services into a new or existing course. The purpose of the program is to create intensive collaboration between faculty and the library, to illustrate the effectiveness of information literacy instruction in improving student outcomes (specifically the UIS Goals and Learning Outcomes for Baccalaureate Education), to develop instructional materials and activities to share with other librarians and faculty, and to advance the use of library services on campus. We are seeking one Associate for the 2016 summer semester.

Please see the Instructional Services page on the Faculty Resource guide for additional information and examples of course-integrated information literacy assignments.

Duration: Takes place during the UIS Summer Session

Stipend: The Library Associate is awarded a $1500 stipend. He or she will devote the equivalent of 5 hours/week on the project during the 8 week summer session.

Expectations

  • Engage in the creation or revision of curriculum for at least one course that will be taught in the upcoming Academic Year
  • Engage in assessment when offering revised course to evaluate the effectiveness of information literacy instruction in improving student learning outcomes
  • Present with Faculty Librarian at an FDO workshop
  • Report on results at departmental meetings & Committee on the Library in the semester after revised course is taught

Eligibility: All full-time faculty members with one year of teaching experience at UIS are eligible. Courses at any level which include a research component will be considered.

Proposal Form

Your proposal must include the following information:

  • Why you are interested in becoming a Library Faculty Associate
  • Your previous experience, if any, with information literacy and the use of library resources and services
  • What you hope to learn from the collaborative experience
  • A description of the course you wish to revise in collaboration with a librarian. Please include a syllabus, assignments, lesson plans and any other relevant materials

Send your proposal by April 8, 2016 to Sarah Sagmoen at sarah.sagmoen@uis.edu

Faculty Open House

Annual Brookens Library Faculty Open House

Please join us for coffee, desserts, and discussion.  Your library liaison will be available to answer any questions you might have about instruction, our new website, materials requests, PlumX, Get it Now, IDEALS, or other library resources and services.  Hope to see you there.

Faculty Open House 2016W8

MARCH: The Struggle for Racial Equality and Social Justice

Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 12.03.48 PMAs you may have seen on campus, in the State Journal Register, in the Illinois Times, or on WUIS, One Book, One UIS is bringing Congressman John Lewis, co-author Andrew Aydin and illustrator Nate Powell to UIS to speak about their graphic memoir, MARCH, as the keynote lecture for the community read initiative. The lecture and discussion will take place at the University of Illinois Springfield Sangamon Auditorium today Monday,  October 19th at 7:00 pm. Tickets are free and available to the public by calling the Sangamon Auditorium Ticket Office at (217) 206-6160.

We hope you can join us for this exciting event!

“March” Selected As 2015/2016 One Book

BookMark2
MARCH, a graphic memoir about the life of civil rights icon John Lewis, has been chosen by the One Book, One UIS Planning Committee as the campus community read for the 2015/2016 academic year.   Congressman Lewis, co-author Andrew Aydin and Illustrator Nate Powell have agreed to speak at UIS. Their presentation will be on Monday, October 19 at 7:00 in Sangamon Auditorium.

Contact: Should you wish to include MARCH in a course during the 2015/2016 academic year, please contact Karen Moranski at kmora1@uis.edu or 217-206-7440; or Kimberly Craig at kcrai01s@uis.edu or 217-206-6245.  For any other information about the 2015/2016 choice please contact Janelle Gurnsey in the Brookens Library: gurnsey.janelle@uis.edu or 217-206-8451.  We will release information about additional programming as it is planned.  For more information about the One Book, One UIS program, including selection criteria, please see: www.onebookoneuis.com.

Congressman John Lewis
John Lewis has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1986, representing the Georgia 5th District.  Born the son of sharecroppers in Pike County, Alabama, Lewis became a civil rights activist while a student at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, organizing sit-ins and participating in freedom rides.  From 1963-1966, Lewis chaired the Student Nonviolent Organizing Committee (SNCC) of which he was a founder.
The title of the book MARCH comes from the many marches that Lewis organized or participated in, including one of the most well-remembered moments in civil rights history—the march over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama on March 7, 1965.  Lewis was one of the organizers of the march, which drew nationwide attention when the non-violent marchers were attacked by Alabama state troopers.  Many historians believe that the images of cruelty from the Selma march were a factor in the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Over the years, Lewis has received many prestigious awards, including the Medal of Freedom (the nation’s highest civilian honor) and the only John F. Kennedy “Profile in Courage” Lifetime Achievement Award ever granted by the John F. Kennedy Foundation.  He has recently been named as the recipient of the Paul H. Douglas Award for Ethics in Government given each year by the Institute of Government and Public Affairs of the University of Illinois.  A ceremony to present the award to Congressman Lewis, hosted by Senator Dick Durbin, will be held on April 29 in Washington, DC.

MARCH
MARCH is planned as a three-volume trilogy.  At UIS, we will be reading volumes one and two.  MARCH: Book One has received numerous awards, including a 2014 American Library Association (ALA) Coretta Scott King Author Honor Award and an ALA Notable Children’s Book designation.  It was also named a “Top Ten Graphic Novel for Teens” by the Young Adults Library Services Association (YALSA) of ALA and made the “best books of 2013” lists of USA Today, The Washington Post, Slate and others.  MARCH: Book Two has just been published and has already garnered a starred review from Kirkus Reviews.

 

Faculty Library Associate Program – Amy Spies

During this past summer, we piloted our first Faculty Associate program.  This program provided an opportunity for faculty members to work with a librarian in order to embed information literacy concepts and skills into new or existing course work.  Over the next few weeks we will be highlighting each of these three faculty/librarian collaborations.

Librarian Nancy Weichert discusses her work with CAP Coordinator of Composition Amy Spies:

This summer, through the Faculty Library Associate Program, I was able to work closely with Amy Spies the CAP Coordinator of Composition & Academic Student Support. Our goal was to rework the information literacy components of CAP 111 – Honors Composition and CAP 115 – Interdisciplinary Writing. Amy and I updated the information literacy components of the courses with an eye on the proposed Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education http://go.uis.edu/ACRLFramework. In 2013 ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force determined that in our ever evolving information ecosystem a move from the traditional standards model to a threshold concepts based framework is needed. The assignments Amy and I reworked integrated the use of tools such as Google, Yelp and UrbanSpoon in tandem with more traditional library research resources. Amy and I continue to meet regularly and view this as an ongoing partnership.

Be on the lookout for our next two spotlights coming soon.  For more information about this summer’s Faculty Associate position, see the Faculty Resources Guide or contact your librarian.