Jackie Jackson Exhibit at Brookens

Jackie Jackson with some of her life’s work boxed to go to the UIS archive. Photo credit: Illinois Times

UIS Professor Emerita of English and Women’s Studies, Jackie Jackson, was featured in a cover story in the November 2, 2017 issue of Illinois Times. To celebrate this honor, UIS Archives/Special Collections has created an exhibit about Jackson on Level 2 of Brookens Library.

Jacqueline Dougan Jackson was born near Beloit, Wisconsin and was raised on her family’s dairy farm.  She graduated from the University of Beloit in 1950, and received an M.A. in Latin from the University of Michigan in 1951. After teaching writing at Kent State University, in 1970 she was hired as a charter faculty member at a new university in Springfield, Illinois, named Sangamon State University (now UIS). She taught at UIS until her retirement in 2000, but, at age 89,  she still teaches writing in her home.

The exhibit includes copies of Jackson’s published books dating back to 1953.  Jackie published several children’s book, but also the Stories from the Round Barn series,  which includes her delightful and thoughtful reminiscences of her early years growing up on a dairy farm, and her remarkable family. The final volume of the Stories from the Round Barn series has just been published, and is the occasion for the Illinois Times feature article.

The exhibit also contains material from the Reading and Writing and Radio Jamboree, organized and directed by Jackie Jackson. Every spring from 1975 to 1993, hundreds of central Illinois schoolchildren converged on the SSU campus for the Jamboree, a festive occasion for students, second grade to high school, to come together and share and present essays on a variety of subjects, both serious and lighthearted. Selected essays would be read and broadcast on the campus radio station.

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New Resources for Students and Researchers

The library recently added a number of new resources that are available for students and researchers alike. There is something new for everyone; books, newspapers, primary source materials, and statistical sources. Besides the new popular collections on the main floor of the library, the library added thousands of new academic resources and tools.

In terms of size the largest number of new items are ebooks through the Springer E-book purchase. The library added the entire 2016 and 2017 collection of Springer electronic books containing over 12,000 books mostly in STM fields but with almost 4,000 books in the Behavioral Science and Psychology, Business and Management, Economics and Finance, and Education subject areas.

Newspapers.com provides access to 200+ million pages of historical newspapers from 5,200+ newspapers from around the United States and beyond. This is a great source for history and other disciplines using primary source materials. The drawback is not getting sidetracked by your favorite historical topic (Titanic, Dillinger, or Pearl Harbor) or just looking at the advertisements and other glimpses at the news of the day from the 1800’s onward.

Need data or statistics? The library now has access to both Statistical Insights and Statistical Abstracts of the United States electronically. Statistical Abstract of the United States includes comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States with 1400+ individually indexed tables (with attached spreadsheets).

The reference collection was enhanced with the acquisitions of the Oxford Handbook Series for 2016 and 2017 in most of the social science disciplines. This resources added 74 books or book series containing almost 3,000 articles on almost every social science subject areas from archology to religion.

The library also renewed its access to the computer science books published by MIT Press and accessible on the IEEE Xplore platform. This brings the current total of basic computer science books on the platform to almost 700 books with the addition of 42 books in 2016 and another 28 so far this year.

Also on the IEEE platform the library added two self-paced courses related to security, the IEEE Cyber Security Program and the IEEE Ethical Hacking Program. Each of these contain over ten modules on various aspects of hacking and computer security. The courses have modules on cloud security, data security, mobile device security, cryptography, cyber security countermeasures, and cyber forensics.

Finally, my favorite new tool is the New Oxford Shakespeare which provides both the original text of all of Shakespeare works with helpful note, definition, or whatever you want to call their unique tool of getting from the old English to something even I can understand. Or there is a version of all of these works pre-translated to modern English but still with the helpful notes or translations. This is great for English as well as Theater or anyone who needs help with their Shakespeare.

 

Reminder: Faculty Reception Today at 4:30 pm

Today is the day! Join us for the Brookens Library Faculty Reception from 4:30-6:00 pm TODAY! Your mid-term grades have been submitted, and it’s the perfect time for a mid-week break, so stop by for a glass of wine or beer, and some tasty snacks. We’ll be talking about research opportunities for faculty and students, and we’d love to meet you and hear more about your research and how Brookens Library can meet those needs. Brief remarks begin at 5:00 pm. 

We hope to see you there!

This Week at Brookens 9/25 – 9/30

What’s Happening at Brookens This Week!

HOMECOMING WEEK:

This week is Homecoming Week at UIS. We are having several events in conjunction with the spirit filled week.

CINRC 40th Anniversary Celebration:

First, we are celebrating the Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center’s 40thAnniversary of serving non-profits on Thursday, September 28, from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. We will be set up on the main level of Brookens Library near the entrance/exit.

The CINRC has been one of the best-kept secrets in Central Illinois for far too long, and we’re hoping to change that.   Come check out our fresh new look and the many resources we have to offer for nonprofits and researchers alike.

In addition to the CINRC’s outreach to the central Illinois nonprofit community, Director Pamela M. Salela has also provided classroom instruction for Public Administration, Human Services, History, Environmental Studies, and Education – both in person as well as online for our distance students. Indeed, any class that can benefit from knowing more about grant researching could find her instructional services of value.

Come help us celebrate this milestone! Light refreshments will be served.

BOOK SALE THURSDAY:

It has become a UIS tradition to host our annual Book Sale the week of Homecoming. This year, we have moved our sale from Friday to Thursday, September 28, with the goal of reaching more students, faculty and staff! We are also extending our hours for the first time this year. We will be open from 9:00 am – 6:00 pm outside Brookens Library under the overhang. We hope this will allow you more time to stop by, shop, and stock up on some great reads. Prices range from $1 – $3 so you won’t want to miss it. Please plan to pay with cash or check. We are unable to accept credit or iCash.

 MAKERS TAKERS SPIRIT EVENT: During the Book Sale, the Library will be hosting a spirit-week event: “Makers Takers, Make Your Own Spirit Decorations.” At this fun-filled event, you will be able to upcycle library materials into new creations. From bookends to buttons, bunting to bookmarks, we will have something for everyone. Stop by Thursday, September 28 and craft with us from 11:00 – 1:00 pm. We will have tables set up next to the Book Sale underneath the overhang of Brookens Library.

BANNED BOOKS WEEK:

This week is a busy week at Brookens. First, it is Banned Books Week! Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Celebrated September 24- September 30, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

Here are Brookens, we have put together a display, located near the front of the library, featuring some of the banned books from our own collection. Our hope is to support the freedom to read during this week, and throughout the year. Stop by and see what we have on display.

We have also created a Banned Books Week featured list in our free eBook and eAudiobook app Cloud Library. Here you can browse over 19,000 free titles. If you haven’t already downloaded this free app to your device or computer, now would be a great time to get started!

Check out social media channels each day for the Banned Book of the Day. We are on FacebookTwitter and Instagram!

Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week: 9/24 – 9/30

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

To continue to raise awareness about the harms of censorship and the freedom to read, the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) publishes an annual list of the Top Ten Most Challenged Books, using information from public challenges reported in the media, as well as censorship reports submitted to the office through its challenge reporting form.

Find out which books made the Top Ten Most Challenged Books of 2016 and explore Top Ten talking points, infographics and social media art on the Top Ten resource page. View the 2017 State of America’s Library Report for more information on censorship, library trends and research. – ALA

Here are Brookens, we have put together a display, located near the front of the library, featuring some of the banned books from our own collection. Our hope is to support the freedom to read during this week, and throughout the year. Stop by and see what we have on display. 

We have also put together a Banned Books Week featured list in our free eBook and eAudiobook app Cloud Library. Here you can browse over 19,000 free titles. If you haven’t already downloaded this free app to your device or computer, now would be a great time to get started!

UIS a Senate Designated Federal Documents Depository

Did you know that UIS is a Senate designated federal documents depository? Yes, that’s right, we are a selective depository collecting primary source material produced by the U.S. Congress, Legislature and the executive branch as well as other agencies and federal bodies.   Since the advent of digital archiving, which really began to proliferate in the 21st century, most information provided through the Government Printing Office (the folks we work with in obtain government documents) is available online.

Recently, the Library of Congress, likely spurred on by the enormous popularity of the hit Broadway musical, “Hamilton,” has digitized many of the papers of Alexander Hamilton, first treasury secretary of the United States. The collection includes over 12,000 items dating from 1708 to 1917 (although not the Federalist essays). Learn more about and gain access to the collection at: https://www.loc.gov/collections/alexander-hamilton-papers/about-this-collection/

The GPO has begun a retrospective digitization of the bound volumes of the Congressional Record, most recently releasing the 1950s, 1940s & 1930s in digital format. The Congressional Record is the official organ of Congress which is a verbatim transcript of everything that occurs on the House & Senate floors (and has existed in some form since the advent of the first Congressional Congress in 1789). Needless to say, this provides for a vitally rich historical record. Here is some of what you can find at your fingertips at: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/collection/crecb

1951-1960 (82nd thru 86th Congresses):

  • The final two years of President Harry Truman’s Administration
  • President Dwight Eisenhower’s Administration
  • The Korean War
  • The Cold War
  • The creation of NASA
  • Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956

1941-1950 (77th thru 81st Congresses):

  • World War II, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous “day that will live in infamy” address to Congress requesting a declaration of war against Japan
  • VE and VJ Days
  • Demobilization
  • The Franklin Roosevelt Presidency through April 1945 and the Presidency of Harry Truman through 1950
  • The Marshall Plan
  • The beginning of the Cold War

1931-1940 (72nd thru 76th Congresses):

  • The Great Depression.
  • The last two years of the Herbert Hoover Administration and the elections of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, 1936, and 1940.
  • The 21st Amendment (ending Prohibition).
  • The New Deal (Emergency Banking Act, Civilian Conservation Corps, Tennessee Valley Authority Act, Glass-Steagall Act, National Industrial Recovery Act, Wagner Act, Social Security Act, Rural Electrification Act, etc.).
  • Senator Huey Long.
  • FDR’s court-packing plan.
  • The various Neutrality Acts, Lend Lease, and the beginning of World War II.

NOTE: to make the best use of the Congressional Record you will need the dates that discussions occurred on the floor:

If you would like to further explore government documents and information and how they might be of value to your teaching or scholarship, please contact Pamela M. Salela, the UIS liaison to Government Information. You can find her contact info on the government Information research guide at: https://libguides.uis.edu/docs

The Library Bill of Rights

Over the past 6 weeks, the Faculty at Brookens Library developed a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. 

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

Below you will find each blog post published as a part of this series.

I: Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/the-library-bill-of-rights-week-

II: Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/15/the-library-bill-or-rights-article-ll/

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/the-library-bill-of-rights-article-

IV: Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/03/29/the-library-bill-of-rights-article-iv/

V: A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.
https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/04/05/the-library-bill-of-rights-article

VI: Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

https://brkfacultyfocus.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/the-library-bill-of-rights-article-vi/

The Library Bill of Rights exists as an ethical statement – libraries are for the people, all of the people. Inclusion is at the heart of every library and librarians share a common set of principles about their work. During difficult times, it can be easy to forget what we stand for and The Library Bill of Rights acts as a steadfast reminder. In the simplest terms, libraries are inclusive spaces that foster access, preservation, freedom of expression, and community engagement.

Interpretations are often nuanced and incomplete. Over the last 6 weeks we’ve shared our interpretations of The Library Bill of Rights with you and now it’s your turn to join in the conversation. Do you believe that these tenets have stood the test of time? Do you see areas in which the core beliefs of academia and the core beliefs of libraries intersect?

Contact us if you’d like to share your interpretations of The Library Bill of Rights with our readers.

Written By: Nancy Weichert, Clinical Assistant Professor/ Instructional Services Librarian

 

The Library Bill of Rights, Article V

Over a 7 week period, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. 

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

___________________________________________________________________

WEEK 5

Article V.  A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

In many ways, libraries are the great equalizer. No matter your educational background, your age, your beliefs, or any other aspect of your identity, libraries are open to all, so that all may obtain the resources they need. Creating and maintaining diverse collections, providing unfiltered access to the Internet, and making costly subscription-based online resources available is our foundation. But these collections and services would be meaningless if we limited access to select groups of people. For that reason, I find article 5 of the Library Bill of Rights to be the most impactful.

As an academic library serving a campus community, our primary focus is the university’s student, staff, and faculty. But our resources and services are not limited to those populations. Our doors are open to all. Research is not exclusively done by those with access to a college education. Using computers and the internet are more increasingly the only way to participate in certain basic functions of daily life, and information literacy is not a skill just for the classroom, but for life. Serving Springfield and beyond is an important part of our job.

This openness extends beyond serving patrons who are not affiliated with our university, but has a much broader scope. Brookens, like all libraries adhering to the Library Bill of Rights, places no limitations on patrons based on their origin, age, background, or views. Just like we make both sides of the issue available in our collections, we make that collection available to those with beliefs on either side of the issue, as well as those in-between and undecided. Additionally, we make no assumptions about what people of particular groups will want or need when providing resources. Instead, deciding what resources are appropriate or of interest is entirely up to each individual to decide, and they will be able to do so without censorship or judgment.

It is our honor to serve our UIS community as well as the community at-large and our responsibility to continue to advocate for their right to access the information all of our patrons need or desire.

Written By: Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services

Tree Dedication for Jane Treadwell 11/10

Please join us in recognizing the leadership of Jane Treadwell, Dean Emeritus.  The Friends of Brookens Library, along with the library staff, are dedicating a Magnolia tree in appreciation of Treadwell’s nearly 14 years of service to Brookens Library at the University of Illinois Springfield.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

4:00 pm – North East Entrance of Brookens Library

friends-tree-dedication-2016-w

Meet the Dean – Faculty Open House

Please join us for the annual Brookens Library Faculty Open House.

Thursday, September 15, 2016
2:00 – 4:00 pm  –   Brookens Library – Lower Level

This year we are welcoming Pattie Piotrowski to Brookens Library
as the new University Librarian and Dean of Library Instructional Services.

Come meet the Dean, learn about your library, and network with your UIS colleagues.
Your library liaison will be available to answer any questions you might have about instruction, our website, materials requests, and more. We hope to see you there!

faculty-meet-the-dean-fall-2016-copy