The Library Bill of Rights: Article ll

Over the next 7 weeks, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. This week we are featuring Article ll.

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

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Library Bill or Rights, Article II.

Written by: Stephen McMinn, Director of Collections & Scholarly Communications

ll: Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

The library Bill of Rights consists of six statements deigned to help define the role of the library and serve as guiding principles for the services they provide. The preamble so to speak, plainly states “that all libraries are forums for information and ideas.” The second of the six articles in the Library Bill of Rights is most closely aligned to the First Amendment to the US Constitution which protects the rights of free speech and that of a free press. This article is written in two parts, the first statement covering the acquisition of all types or viewpoints of information, and the second part opposing removal of information due to the objection of others. This article states, “Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues, and materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.” Essentially, it states that all types of information should be included or made available such that people can explore all sides of an issue, topic, or area of study.

Many of the articles in the Library Bill of Rights are similar or related to the overall goal of providing access to information and ideas with subtle differences. One could question how this statement is different than the first article or the next article dealing with censorship. The subtle difference from the first article is this article is centered on content of the information collected whereas the 1st article is more focused on who created the content. In terms of censorship, this statement is more specific as it opposes removing items from the library because they do not fit their individual beliefs or world view as opposed to taking a stand against censorship which is the government trying to keep out ideas or information. In my view, these guiding principles are important to a healthy and vibrant society as understanding other people’s beliefs, cultures, and views leads to better understanding and empathy. However, taking these positions just like free speech is difficult and can lead to misunderstandings of the library’s role in providing a forum for information and ideas.

One of my favorite lines that describes the issues with holding these beliefs is from the movie, An American President, where the president states “America is advanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, ’cause it’s gonna put up a fight. It’s gonna say “You want free speech? Let’s see you acknowledge a man whose words make your blood boil, who’s standing center stage and advocating at the top of his lungs that which you would spend a lifetime opposing at the top of yours.” It’s easy when everyone agrees with you, it’s difficult when peoples’ strongly held beliefs go against yours, but hopefully the role of the library in presenting all types of information with all types of ideas and viewpoints, can foster understanding which will ultimately bring people together, not pull them apart.

Stephen McMinn, Director of Collections & Scholarly Communications

 

 

 

 

Warm Wishes from the Library

Let it Snow Brookens Library Chalkboard Art

We hope that this semester has been a successful one for you and your students.  As you wrap up grading and head out for winter break, we’re sure you’re already starting to ponder your spring classes.  As you begin to prepare, we just wanted to remind you that we’re here to help.  Whether you want to create a new research assignment, update an existing one, or embed information literacy instruction into your coursed (both on-ground or online) your library liaison is available to collaborate with you.  For more information about our resources and services, visit our Faculty Resources guide. We hope you have a pleasant and refreshing winter break, and we look forward to working with you in the new year!

Faculty Open House

Annual Brookens Library Faculty Open House

Please join us for coffee, desserts, and discussion.  Your library liaison will be available to answer any questions you might have about instruction, our new website, materials requests, PlumX, Get it Now, IDEALS, or other library resources and services.  Hope to see you there.

Faculty Open House 2016W8

Welcome Back

Welcome to the start of the Fall semester. This Fall, Brookens Library has some awesome events planned, including One Book, One UIS activities, library tours and orientations, and a myriad of instructional sessions. Talk to your librarian liaison to schedule library instruction for your classes (we do face-to-face and online instruction). We can also provide one-on-one research consultations to you and your students.

Drop-in library tours are offered each semester and we’ve scheduled both on-campus Tours and online Virtual Tours for Fall. The Tours cover where to find books and articles, how to access resources from off-campus, where to get research help, and more! See the Brookens Library calendar for dates and times.

If you would like a tour or other library instruction during class time, contact your library liaison to schedule.

Remember that we can also order materials for the library collection; however, due to the lack of a budget for FY2015/16 the library is not currently ordering materials unless an item is urgently needed. If you need to request such an item, please contact your liaison.

We are eagerly looking forward to the One Book, One UIS events this year. MARCH, a graphic memoir about the life of civil rights icon John Lewis, has been chosen as the campus community read for the 2015/2016 academic year.   Congressman Lewis, co-author Andrew Aydin and Illustrator Nate Powell have agreed to speak at the University of Illinois Springfield in conjunction with the program. Their presentation will be on Monday, October 19 at 7:00 in Sangamon Auditorium. Check the UIS calendar for other events related to One Book, One UIS.

Brookens Library and the Library Instructional Services Program look forward to working with you and your students this semester. See you in the library!

Picking Your Topic IS Research

There is an important step in the research process that is often overlooked: selecting a topic. Too often students let their passion for a topic run away with them and forget to consider if it is appropriate for the assignment. And in some cases even when they start to struggle with their topic, they are hesitant to change it after getting started. We’re sure you see this in class, we certainly see it in the library. Today, we’re highlighting an excellent resource that you can use to introduce the idea that selecting a topic is part of the research process, not something you do before you begin to research. It’s a go-to resource for us, and hope it will be for you too. This short, and fun, video from North Carolina State University Libraries is a great way to start a dialogue about how best to go about selecting a topic.

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/picking_topic/

Of course, this can lead to discussions about how to dissect assignments and begin researching once a topic has been selected. Our librarians are equipped with activities and more than happy to provide instruction to your students on any of these topics. Be sure to contact your library liaison with any questions or to set up an instruction session.

Locating Private Foundation Funding Workshop: 3/12

Pamela M. Salela, Associate Professor, Coordinator, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center, will be offering the Locating Private Foundation Funding Workshop Thursday, March 12 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm in Brookens 141-B.

Locating Private Foundation Funding: Pamela M. Salela, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center

Free community workshop on locating private foundation money & the use of the Center’s resources.

Thursday, March 12; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library: This workshop will include:

• Demonstration of the specialized database, Foundation Directory Online Professional.
• Introduction on what to consider when seeking private foundation monies
• Interpreting the information found about a foundation and its funding areas.
• Information regarding locating the Foundation Center’s online tutorials and webstreams
• Instruction on the use of CINRC reference materials to supplement your grant search.
• Discussion of tips about proposal writing and communicating with the foundations.

Due to limited seating and resources, REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/7937717

Contact:
Pamela M. Salela
Phone 217-206-6783
Registration REGISTRATION

CINRC Workshops Spring 2015

This spring semester the Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center at Brookens Library is hosting 11 workshops. Please feel free to share with those you think may benefit. All of the workshops are free of charge and are open to the public.

Locating Private Foundation Funding: Pamela M. Salela, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center

Thursday, February 5; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library:  This workshop will include a demonstration of the specialized database, Foundation Directory Online Professional along with an introduction on what to consider when seeking private foundation monies. You’ll know where to locate the Foundation Center’s online tutorials and Web streams. We’ll also include discussion of tips about proposal writing and communicating with the foundations. Due to limited seating and resources, registration is required. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/3008254

 

Loud & Clear: Low-cost, high-impact marketing for small and mid-sized nonprofits: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, February 10; 1-2:30PM; UIS Brookens Library:  As non-profits compete for public support, financial resources, and even volunteers, any chance to tell your organization’s story and boost your visibility is an opportunity to engage the community with your cause, build buy-in, attract supporters, and draw in clients and customers. From the elevator to the evening news, marketing and public relations play a critical role in helping advance your organization’s mission. This session is geared toward staff, volunteers, and board members who want to learn great low-cost, high-impact marketing and public relations ideas and find out what works and what doesn’t in telling your story. Learn to identify ideal target audiences, great storytelling techniques to grab attention, how people actually listen and learn, effective low-cost techniques to reach new and existing audiences, and how each person in your organization can make a difference. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/5609483

 

Getting Grassroots Gifts: The lifeblood of a healthy nonprofit: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, February 10; 3:30-5PM; UIS Brookens Library:  In this session, attendees will learn how to effectively raise money from people. With nearly 80% of charitable dollars coming from individuals (compared to 15% from grants), it is critically important for nonprofits of all sizes to develop a strong, sustainable, and thriving grassroots giving program. From $20 donors to annual givers to major gifts, learn the not-so-secret secrets of how and why people give, how and when to ask them, and other useful tips. This session is most helpful when taken hand-in-hand with “Loud & Clear: Low-cost, high-impact marketing for small and mid-sized nonprofits” on just prior to this session on from 1-2:30PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/6032270.  Great follow ups to this session also include “Creating Amazing Special Events” (February 18; 10-11:30AM) and “Show-Stopping Fundraising Appeal Letters”(February 18; 10-11:30AM).

 

Creating Amazing Special Events of All Types: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 18; 10-11:30AM; Lincoln Public Library:  If you think about all the events you’ve attended over the years, there are those you remember and look forward to attending, and those you would prefer to forget (and perhaps even left early from). Creating those memorable events packed with amazing results is hard work, especially if event planning isn’t your forte. At this workshop, discover the inside tips, techniques, and tricks of pulling off flawless events, developing the confidence you need to pull everything off like a pro. From staff retreats to annual dinners to volunteer gatherings to major conferences, you’ll learn to anticipate needs and details, plan for the worst, and see the nuts and bolts needed behind-the-scenes and front stage to create well-run professional gatherings. A helpful session to take in conjunction with this workshop is “Getting Grassroots Gifts: The lifeblood of a healthy nonprofit” on Tuesday, February 10 from 3:30-5PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/5763225

 

Show-stopping Fundraising Appeal Letters: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 18; 1-2:30PM; Lincoln Public Library:  With mailboxes filled with advertising slicks, junk mail, and endless appeals for money, it might seem an impossible task to get your fundraising letter to be the first things your supporters open. But it’s easier than you think. In this session, learn the tried-and-true techniques of preparing fundraising appeal letters that your supporters will not be able to resist. Start moving your reply rates from 1-2% up to 10-20% and see donations – and donation amount – rise. All with a few easy techniques, a bit of elbow grease, and a long-term vision. A helpful session to take in conjunction with this workshop is “Getting Grassroots Gifts: The lifeblood of a healthy nonprofit” on February 10 from 3:30-5PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/6020918

 

Planning to Succeed: The Nuts & Bolts of Strategic and Organizational Plans: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 25; 10-11:30AM; Lincoln Public Library:  Strategic and organizational planning is critically important to the success of any nonprofit – and to engaging broad organizational audiences. But it’s hard to do well, and many groups suffer from outdated, dusty, boring or confusing – or even nonexistent – plans. In this session, you’ll learn the nuts and bolts of solid strategic plans – a structure that can (and should) be used to develop development plans, communications plans, and program plans. While we won’t be creating any plans in this session (these are organization-wide processes), you’ll learn what steps you need to take to create real, living documents, and what truly meaningful and engaging plans look like (and how they can transform your organization’s operations). Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/9935008

 

Metrics, KPI, and Statistics, oh my! Measuring – and sharing – what matters in nonprofits: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 25; 1-2:30PM; Lincoln Public Library:  Today the value and use of evaluation and metrics to nonprofit organizations has never been more important – or required. From mandated use of various forms for accountability to donor-driven transparency to volunteer program efficiency, understanding and keeping evaluation and benchmarking statistics and tools is now a non-negotiable part of running a top-shelf nonprofit. But while most nonprofits get high marks in delivering value, we easily get lost in numbers, floating amidst the sea of data available for us to measure and share. In this workshop, learn to stay competitive and compliant, demonstrate the value of your work, and report outcomes in ways that engage and excite donors, funders, elected officials, and other constituencies.  Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/2158539

 

I’m No Dummy: But can someone show me how Facebook really works?: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, March 3; 1-2:30PM; UIS Brookens Library:  People love it or hate it. In today’s age, the importance of Facebook to nonprofits cannot be overstated. Done right, Facebook can help put your group on the proverbial map. Done wrong, it can stagnate and leave your group looking backwards and behind-the-times. In this 1.5 hour hands-on, interactive workshop conducted in a computer lab, learn the latest tricks and tips for using personal and organizational Facebook pages to maximize impact. Learn to invigorate board, staff, public, and client engagement, and learn how to use ads, Facebook insights, and best settings to increase engagement while protecting your interests. A great pairing to this workshop is “WWW: What does your website really say about your organization?” held later this same day from 3:30-5PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/8094718

 

WWW: What does your website really say about your organization?: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, March 3; 3:30-5PM; UIS Brookens Library:  Does your website build relationships? Engage donors? Excite volunteers? Assist clients? Does it really? In this hands-on, interactive workshop conducted in a computer lab, we’ll take a critical look at your website against best practices, analyzing it top-to-bottom for clarity, image, and ranking. We’ll dig deep, looking at navigation, accessibility, SEO, keywords, and take a serious look at content.

In today’s digital world the content on our websites (and/or Facebook) is often the first, and possibly the only, communication we have with our visitors. It’s important that your website make the cut – or even be a cut above. In this session, we’ll be acting as our own customers – donors, volunteers, clients, media, and others – to see how they see us on the web, determining what changes to make to increase effectiveness. A helpful session to take in conjunction with this workshop is “I’m No Dummy: But can someone show me how Facebook really works?” earlier this day from 1-2:30PM.   Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/6682138

 

Locating Private Foundation Funding: Pamela M. Salela, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center

Thursday, March 12; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library:  This workshop will include a demonstration of the specialized database, Foundation Directory Online Professional along with an introduction on what to consider when seeking private foundation monies. You’ll know where to locate the Foundation Center’s online tutorials and Web streams. We’ll also include discussion of tips about proposal writing and communicating with the foundations. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/7937717

 

Community Health & Socioeconomic Data at Your Fingertips: Paula Gramley, Community Benefits Coordinator, Memorial Health System

Thursday, April 9; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library:  The workshop will provide an introduction to a free online database at www.choosememorial.org/healthycommunities. This site provides community demographics and rankings of more than 100 health and socioeconomic indicators for Sangamon, Logan, Morgan and Christian counties.  Information is updated regularly so that the data is the latest available. Community data is available in seven categories: health, economy, education, environment, public safety, social environment and transportation. This data may help organizations with goal setting, need assessments, grant writing and other work. Workshop includes hands on component at computer. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/4755484

 

 

Welcome Back Faculty

As we welcome students back to campus, your librarians are gearing up for a semester full of instruction, orientations and other events.

Do your students need a refresher on what Brookens Library offers? If so, send them on a Library Tour! We’ve scheduled both on-campus Tours and online Virtual Tours for Spring semester. The Tour covers where to find books and articles, how to access resources from off-campus, where to get research help, and more! See the Brookens Library calendar for dates and times.

If you would like a tour or other library instruction during class time, contact your library liaison to schedule. (We do online instruction, too.)

Your library liaison can provide library instruction to your classes and one-on-one research consultations to you and your students. The librarians have created online Research Guides for every major which can be accessed through the automatically provided link in your course Black Board. Video and interactive tutorials covering a wide range of skills and concepts are available for your use; embed in Black Board, or assign to students outside of class. Please contact your liaison to discuss ways to incorporate library instruction and resources into your courses.

The library has several resources especially for faculty: a Faculty Resource page which contains policies, procedures and other information, this Faculty Focus blog, and an email newsletter to keep you up-to-date on library resources and events. Librarians are always happy to attend, by invitation, your department’s faculty meetings.

Remember that we can also order materials for the library collection; just send requests to your liaison.

Brookens Library and the Library Instructional Services Program look forward to working with you and your students this semester. See you in the library!

Event: Using EndNote Web 11/19 at Noon

Using EndNote Web to Create Bibliographies and Organize Your Research

November 19th at noon in room 141B – Brookens Library

EndNote Web the web version of the popular but expensive bibliographic management application, EndNote, is freely available to all UIS faculty and students due to the library’s subscription to Thomson databases.  This session will provide an overview of the features of this application as well as how to use it to organize your literature and create bibliographies.

Event: Bibliographic Management Tools 11/19 at 11am

Bibliographic Management Tools – What They Are, What They Do, and Finding the Right One for You.

November 19th at 11 am in Room 141B – Brookens Library.

Bibliographic Management Tools such as EndNote and Zotero can help you organize your research and help save time in your writing by easing the burden of citing references and building bibliographies.  Come learn how these applications work, what they can do, and find the one that best fits your specific need.   Are they worth the cost  or will one of the several free applications meet your needs.