Faculty Reception: October 25

Save the date for October 25th and join Brookens Library for a Faculty Reception from 4:30-6:00 pm. Your mid-term grades have been submitted, and it’s the perfect time for a mid-week break, so stop by for a glass of wine or beer, and some tasty snacks. We’ll be talking about research opportunities for faculty and students, and we’d love to meet you and hear more about your research and how Brookens Library can meet those needs.  

We hope to see you there!

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Librarians to Attend ILA Conference

Many of the Brookens librarians will be heading to the Illinois Library Association’s Annual Conference – Rise Up (https://www.ila.org/events/annual-conference) this week, October 10-12. Here’s a glimpse of what they’ll be doing.

Pattie Piotrowski, University Librarian & Dean of Library Instructional Services, serves on the ILA Executive Board in the position of Immediate Past President and serves as the Chair of the ILA Nominating Committee. As Past President, she’ll be part of the trio of emcees at the Awards Luncheon on Tuesday, will be catching up with friends and colleagues at the Academic Librarians Unconference and the Illinois Association of College and Research Libraries (IACRL) luncheon on Wednesday, and will be meeting with members of ILA’s Nominating Committee planning the slate for next year’s elections. She’s also looking forward to attending sessions, visiting the exhibits, and going to social events such as the Pub Stroll.

John Laubersheimer, Instructional Services Librarian, is looking forward to attending an array of sessions. He’s most interested in learning about ideas on improving library assessment practices and will be attending “Interrupting the Research Process: Using Standard Content and Rubrics for Student Success”. Beyond that, he wants to focus on sharing ideas internally with library colleagues and will be attending “Bring the Conference Home: Using the Conference Format for Staff Training and Professional Development” He also serves on the ILA Awards Committee and will be participating in the awards luncheon.

 

Sarah Sagmoen, Instructional Services Librarian & Director of Learning Commons and User Services, is the Co-Chair of the Conference Program Committee. She’s most looking forward to hearing Verna Myers keynote on empowering people of all backgrounds to contribute at their highest levels. Sarah will also be participating on a panel, along with 3 other state university librarians, discussing the impacts of two years of a lack of a state budget. The session is entitled Hard Times: Operating User Services on Short Staff, Short Funds, and Short Hope. The panelists will discuss how labor was redistributed from within departments and elsewhere, along with the effects on service, staff, and morale.

Janelle Gurnsey, Outreach and Communications Coordinator, and Nancy Weichert, Instructional Services Librarian, will be co-presenting on their efforts to engage and connect with students. Their session, Re-Sourcing Your Resources: Working with What You Have to Inspire Creative Engagement, will highlight how they’ve repurposed traditionally discarded materials such as card catalog cards, bookends, and book covers to connect with, inspire, and engage their users in new and exciting ways.

In her role as an ILA Diversity Committee member Nancy will also co-facilitate the ILA Diversity Committee program DiversiTEA where participants will be encouraged to share diversity and inclusion initiatives at their libraries. She will also contribute to the Diversity Report Poster Session, which highlights library programs and services targeting diverse and underserved audiences.

This Week at Brookens 9/25 – 9/30

What’s Happening at Brookens This Week!

HOMECOMING WEEK:

This week is Homecoming Week at UIS. We are having several events in conjunction with the spirit filled week.

CINRC 40th Anniversary Celebration:

First, we are celebrating the Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center’s 40thAnniversary of serving non-profits on Thursday, September 28, from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. We will be set up on the main level of Brookens Library near the entrance/exit.

The CINRC has been one of the best-kept secrets in Central Illinois for far too long, and we’re hoping to change that.   Come check out our fresh new look and the many resources we have to offer for nonprofits and researchers alike.

In addition to the CINRC’s outreach to the central Illinois nonprofit community, Director Pamela M. Salela has also provided classroom instruction for Public Administration, Human Services, History, Environmental Studies, and Education – both in person as well as online for our distance students. Indeed, any class that can benefit from knowing more about grant researching could find her instructional services of value.

Come help us celebrate this milestone! Light refreshments will be served.

BOOK SALE THURSDAY:

It has become a UIS tradition to host our annual Book Sale the week of Homecoming. This year, we have moved our sale from Friday to Thursday, September 28, with the goal of reaching more students, faculty and staff! We are also extending our hours for the first time this year. We will be open from 9:00 am – 6:00 pm outside Brookens Library under the overhang. We hope this will allow you more time to stop by, shop, and stock up on some great reads. Prices range from $1 – $3 so you won’t want to miss it. Please plan to pay with cash or check. We are unable to accept credit or iCash.

 MAKERS TAKERS SPIRIT EVENT: During the Book Sale, the Library will be hosting a spirit-week event: “Makers Takers, Make Your Own Spirit Decorations.” At this fun-filled event, you will be able to upcycle library materials into new creations. From bookends to buttons, bunting to bookmarks, we will have something for everyone. Stop by Thursday, September 28 and craft with us from 11:00 – 1:00 pm. We will have tables set up next to the Book Sale underneath the overhang of Brookens Library.

BANNED BOOKS WEEK:

This week is a busy week at Brookens. First, it is Banned Books Week! Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Celebrated September 24- September 30, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

Here are Brookens, we have put together a display, located near the front of the library, featuring some of the banned books from our own collection. Our hope is to support the freedom to read during this week, and throughout the year. Stop by and see what we have on display.

We have also created a Banned Books Week featured list in our free eBook and eAudiobook app Cloud Library. Here you can browse over 19,000 free titles. If you haven’t already downloaded this free app to your device or computer, now would be a great time to get started!

Check out social media channels each day for the Banned Book of the Day. We are on FacebookTwitter and Instagram!

UIS a Senate Designated Federal Documents Depository

Did you know that UIS is a Senate designated federal documents depository? Yes, that’s right, we are a selective depository collecting primary source material produced by the U.S. Congress, Legislature and the executive branch as well as other agencies and federal bodies.   Since the advent of digital archiving, which really began to proliferate in the 21st century, most information provided through the Government Printing Office (the folks we work with in obtain government documents) is available online.

Recently, the Library of Congress, likely spurred on by the enormous popularity of the hit Broadway musical, “Hamilton,” has digitized many of the papers of Alexander Hamilton, first treasury secretary of the United States. The collection includes over 12,000 items dating from 1708 to 1917 (although not the Federalist essays). Learn more about and gain access to the collection at: https://www.loc.gov/collections/alexander-hamilton-papers/about-this-collection/

The GPO has begun a retrospective digitization of the bound volumes of the Congressional Record, most recently releasing the 1950s, 1940s & 1930s in digital format. The Congressional Record is the official organ of Congress which is a verbatim transcript of everything that occurs on the House & Senate floors (and has existed in some form since the advent of the first Congressional Congress in 1789). Needless to say, this provides for a vitally rich historical record. Here is some of what you can find at your fingertips at: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/collection/crecb

1951-1960 (82nd thru 86th Congresses):

  • The final two years of President Harry Truman’s Administration
  • President Dwight Eisenhower’s Administration
  • The Korean War
  • The Cold War
  • The creation of NASA
  • Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956

1941-1950 (77th thru 81st Congresses):

  • World War II, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous “day that will live in infamy” address to Congress requesting a declaration of war against Japan
  • VE and VJ Days
  • Demobilization
  • The Franklin Roosevelt Presidency through April 1945 and the Presidency of Harry Truman through 1950
  • The Marshall Plan
  • The beginning of the Cold War

1931-1940 (72nd thru 76th Congresses):

  • The Great Depression.
  • The last two years of the Herbert Hoover Administration and the elections of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, 1936, and 1940.
  • The 21st Amendment (ending Prohibition).
  • The New Deal (Emergency Banking Act, Civilian Conservation Corps, Tennessee Valley Authority Act, Glass-Steagall Act, National Industrial Recovery Act, Wagner Act, Social Security Act, Rural Electrification Act, etc.).
  • Senator Huey Long.
  • FDR’s court-packing plan.
  • The various Neutrality Acts, Lend Lease, and the beginning of World War II.

NOTE: to make the best use of the Congressional Record you will need the dates that discussions occurred on the floor:

If you would like to further explore government documents and information and how they might be of value to your teaching or scholarship, please contact Pamela M. Salela, the UIS liaison to Government Information. You can find her contact info on the government Information research guide at: https://libguides.uis.edu/docs

The Library Bill of Rights: Article ll

Over the next 7 weeks, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. This week we are featuring Article ll.

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

_________________________________________________________________________

Library Bill or Rights, Article II.

Written by: Stephen McMinn, Director of Collections & Scholarly Communications

ll: Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

The library Bill of Rights consists of six statements deigned to help define the role of the library and serve as guiding principles for the services they provide. The preamble so to speak, plainly states “that all libraries are forums for information and ideas.” The second of the six articles in the Library Bill of Rights is most closely aligned to the First Amendment to the US Constitution which protects the rights of free speech and that of a free press. This article is written in two parts, the first statement covering the acquisition of all types or viewpoints of information, and the second part opposing removal of information due to the objection of others. This article states, “Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues, and materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.” Essentially, it states that all types of information should be included or made available such that people can explore all sides of an issue, topic, or area of study.

Many of the articles in the Library Bill of Rights are similar or related to the overall goal of providing access to information and ideas with subtle differences. One could question how this statement is different than the first article or the next article dealing with censorship. The subtle difference from the first article is this article is centered on content of the information collected whereas the 1st article is more focused on who created the content. In terms of censorship, this statement is more specific as it opposes removing items from the library because they do not fit their individual beliefs or world view as opposed to taking a stand against censorship which is the government trying to keep out ideas or information. In my view, these guiding principles are important to a healthy and vibrant society as understanding other people’s beliefs, cultures, and views leads to better understanding and empathy. However, taking these positions just like free speech is difficult and can lead to misunderstandings of the library’s role in providing a forum for information and ideas.

One of my favorite lines that describes the issues with holding these beliefs is from the movie, An American President, where the president states “America is advanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, ’cause it’s gonna put up a fight. It’s gonna say “You want free speech? Let’s see you acknowledge a man whose words make your blood boil, who’s standing center stage and advocating at the top of his lungs that which you would spend a lifetime opposing at the top of yours.” It’s easy when everyone agrees with you, it’s difficult when peoples’ strongly held beliefs go against yours, but hopefully the role of the library in presenting all types of information with all types of ideas and viewpoints, can foster understanding which will ultimately bring people together, not pull them apart.

Stephen McMinn, Director of Collections & Scholarly Communications

 

 

 

 

Warm Wishes from the Library

Let it Snow Brookens Library Chalkboard Art

We hope that this semester has been a successful one for you and your students.  As you wrap up grading and head out for winter break, we’re sure you’re already starting to ponder your spring classes.  As you begin to prepare, we just wanted to remind you that we’re here to help.  Whether you want to create a new research assignment, update an existing one, or embed information literacy instruction into your coursed (both on-ground or online) your library liaison is available to collaborate with you.  For more information about our resources and services, visit our Faculty Resources guide. We hope you have a pleasant and refreshing winter break, and we look forward to working with you in the new year!

New Look for Research Guides

Our Research Guides have a new look this semester. We’ve made some changes based on a DePaul University user study[PDF] and best practices that say, among other things, that online research guides should be more subject focused (fewer “general purpose” resources), and should not overwhelm users with too many choices.

Lib Guides The subject-specific content on the new Guides is (nearly) identical to the old Research Guides. We hope that it is presented in a way is clear and concise for you and your students. Please feel free to offer feedback on your guide(s). Your library liaison can create a course-specific guide if the subject guide does not meet your needs.

Did you know that your Blackboard course site has a link to your subject focused research guide? Clicking on “Library Research Help” will bring your students to a page with links to your subject’s Research Guide and your library liaison’s contact information.

Blackboard link to Library Research Guides

Picking Your Topic IS Research

There is an important step in the research process that is often overlooked: selecting a topic. Too often students let their passion for a topic run away with them and forget to consider if it is appropriate for the assignment. And in some cases even when they start to struggle with their topic, they are hesitant to change it after getting started. We’re sure you see this in class, we certainly see it in the library. Today, we’re highlighting an excellent resource that you can use to introduce the idea that selecting a topic is part of the research process, not something you do before you begin to research. It’s a go-to resource for us, and hope it will be for you too. This short, and fun, video from North Carolina State University Libraries is a great way to start a dialogue about how best to go about selecting a topic.

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/picking_topic/

Of course, this can lead to discussions about how to dissect assignments and begin researching once a topic has been selected. Our librarians are equipped with activities and more than happy to provide instruction to your students on any of these topics. Be sure to contact your library liaison with any questions or to set up an instruction session.

Locating Private Foundation Funding Workshop: 3/12

Pamela M. Salela, Associate Professor, Coordinator, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center, will be offering the Locating Private Foundation Funding Workshop Thursday, March 12 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm in Brookens 141-B.

Locating Private Foundation Funding: Pamela M. Salela, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center

Free community workshop on locating private foundation money & the use of the Center’s resources.

Thursday, March 12; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library: This workshop will include:

• Demonstration of the specialized database, Foundation Directory Online Professional.
• Introduction on what to consider when seeking private foundation monies
• Interpreting the information found about a foundation and its funding areas.
• Information regarding locating the Foundation Center’s online tutorials and webstreams
• Instruction on the use of CINRC reference materials to supplement your grant search.
• Discussion of tips about proposal writing and communicating with the foundations.

Due to limited seating and resources, REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/7937717

Contact:
Pamela M. Salela
Phone 217-206-6783
Registration REGISTRATION

Event: Using EndNote Web 11/19 at Noon

Using EndNote Web to Create Bibliographies and Organize Your Research

November 19th at noon in room 141B – Brookens Library

EndNote Web the web version of the popular but expensive bibliographic management application, EndNote, is freely available to all UIS faculty and students due to the library’s subscription to Thomson databases.  This session will provide an overview of the features of this application as well as how to use it to organize your literature and create bibliographies.