Jackie Jackson Exhibit at Brookens

Jackie Jackson with some of her life’s work boxed to go to the UIS archive. Photo credit: Illinois Times

UIS Professor Emerita of English and Women’s Studies, Jackie Jackson, was featured in a cover story in the November 2, 2017 issue of Illinois Times. To celebrate this honor, UIS Archives/Special Collections has created an exhibit about Jackson on Level 2 of Brookens Library.

Jacqueline Dougan Jackson was born near Beloit, Wisconsin and was raised on her family’s dairy farm.  She graduated from the University of Beloit in 1950, and received an M.A. in Latin from the University of Michigan in 1951. After teaching writing at Kent State University, in 1970 she was hired as a charter faculty member at a new university in Springfield, Illinois, named Sangamon State University (now UIS). She taught at UIS until her retirement in 2000, but, at age 89,  she still teaches writing in her home.

The exhibit includes copies of Jackson’s published books dating back to 1953.  Jackie published several children’s book, but also the Stories from the Round Barn series,  which includes her delightful and thoughtful reminiscences of her early years growing up on a dairy farm, and her remarkable family. The final volume of the Stories from the Round Barn series has just been published, and is the occasion for the Illinois Times feature article.

The exhibit also contains material from the Reading and Writing and Radio Jamboree, organized and directed by Jackie Jackson. Every spring from 1975 to 1993, hundreds of central Illinois schoolchildren converged on the SSU campus for the Jamboree, a festive occasion for students, second grade to high school, to come together and share and present essays on a variety of subjects, both serious and lighthearted. Selected essays would be read and broadcast on the campus radio station.

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Reminder: Faculty Reception Today at 4:30 pm

Today is the day! Join us for the Brookens Library Faculty Reception from 4:30-6:00 pm TODAY! Your mid-term grades have been submitted, and it’s the perfect time for a mid-week break, so stop by for a glass of wine or beer, and some tasty snacks. We’ll be talking about research opportunities for faculty and students, and we’d love to meet you and hear more about your research and how Brookens Library can meet those needs. Brief remarks begin at 5:00 pm. 

We hope to see you there!

Faculty Reception: October 25

Save the date for October 25th and join Brookens Library for a Faculty Reception from 4:30-6:00 pm. Your mid-term grades have been submitted, and it’s the perfect time for a mid-week break, so stop by for a glass of wine or beer, and some tasty snacks. We’ll be talking about research opportunities for faculty and students, and we’d love to meet you and hear more about your research and how Brookens Library can meet those needs.  

We hope to see you there!

Librarians to Attend ILA Conference

Many of the Brookens librarians will be heading to the Illinois Library Association’s Annual Conference – Rise Up (https://www.ila.org/events/annual-conference) this week, October 10-12. Here’s a glimpse of what they’ll be doing.

Pattie Piotrowski, University Librarian & Dean of Library Instructional Services, serves on the ILA Executive Board in the position of Immediate Past President and serves as the Chair of the ILA Nominating Committee. As Past President, she’ll be part of the trio of emcees at the Awards Luncheon on Tuesday, will be catching up with friends and colleagues at the Academic Librarians Unconference and the Illinois Association of College and Research Libraries (IACRL) luncheon on Wednesday, and will be meeting with members of ILA’s Nominating Committee planning the slate for next year’s elections. She’s also looking forward to attending sessions, visiting the exhibits, and going to social events such as the Pub Stroll.

John Laubersheimer, Instructional Services Librarian, is looking forward to attending an array of sessions. He’s most interested in learning about ideas on improving library assessment practices and will be attending “Interrupting the Research Process: Using Standard Content and Rubrics for Student Success”. Beyond that, he wants to focus on sharing ideas internally with library colleagues and will be attending “Bring the Conference Home: Using the Conference Format for Staff Training and Professional Development” He also serves on the ILA Awards Committee and will be participating in the awards luncheon.

 

Sarah Sagmoen, Instructional Services Librarian & Director of Learning Commons and User Services, is the Co-Chair of the Conference Program Committee. She’s most looking forward to hearing Verna Myers keynote on empowering people of all backgrounds to contribute at their highest levels. Sarah will also be participating on a panel, along with 3 other state university librarians, discussing the impacts of two years of a lack of a state budget. The session is entitled Hard Times: Operating User Services on Short Staff, Short Funds, and Short Hope. The panelists will discuss how labor was redistributed from within departments and elsewhere, along with the effects on service, staff, and morale.

Janelle Gurnsey, Outreach and Communications Coordinator, and Nancy Weichert, Instructional Services Librarian, will be co-presenting on their efforts to engage and connect with students. Their session, Re-Sourcing Your Resources: Working with What You Have to Inspire Creative Engagement, will highlight how they’ve repurposed traditionally discarded materials such as card catalog cards, bookends, and book covers to connect with, inspire, and engage their users in new and exciting ways.

In her role as an ILA Diversity Committee member Nancy will also co-facilitate the ILA Diversity Committee program DiversiTEA where participants will be encouraged to share diversity and inclusion initiatives at their libraries. She will also contribute to the Diversity Report Poster Session, which highlights library programs and services targeting diverse and underserved audiences.

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Mango’s Language Courses

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Mango’s language courses

 Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 to recognize the contributions that have been made by Americans with ancestry in Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Learn about the rich cultural and linguistic diversity present in the United States with Mango, an online language learning resource that faculty, students and staff can access through Brookens Library.

Mango’s language lessons focus on words and phrases that will be valuable in common, real life situations for over 70 different languages. It’s the perfect fit for students with busy schedules or faculty looking for a tool to help supplement a course or topic that is being taught on campus.

Here are a few ways to discover Hispanic cultures this month:

Learn a new language.

 Do you need to brush up on your Spanish or Portuguese? Mango offers Spanish (Latin America), Spanish (Spain), and Portuguese courses that break down lessons into small, bite-sized chunks and gives language learners access to features like voice comparison technology, interactive grammar lessons, and cultural insight tips.

To help you practice Spanish and Portuguese on the go, iPhone and Android apps are available for free download that will link to your Mango account.

Discover Spanish culture.

Mango highlights a variety of cultural traditions through language and grammar lessons. Explore the tradition of flamenco dancing with a Spanish course that talks about the culture of this dance style or learn soccer-specific Castilian Spanish with lessons that teach you how to discuss soccer matches and express your love of the game with your friends.

Enhance real world professional skills.

With foreign language skills being an important asset in the workplace, Mango offers specialty courses that focus on language skills students need for conference calls, texting, and business-related terminology.

Gain the upper hand this month with a new vocabulary of Spanish legal terms and medical terminology.

Watch a foreign language film.

Mango has several feature-length Spanish movies. You can choose to watch the full movie or choose to have interactive lessons that share words and cultural notes about what you see in the film. Watch Viva Cuba for a movie with Romeo and Juliet undertones or Lake Tahoe, which follows the absurd journey of a teenager looking for someone who can help fix his car.

To get started, access Mango’s offerings on the library’s website and create a free profile to get started.

 

UIS a Senate Designated Federal Documents Depository

Did you know that UIS is a Senate designated federal documents depository? Yes, that’s right, we are a selective depository collecting primary source material produced by the U.S. Congress, Legislature and the executive branch as well as other agencies and federal bodies.   Since the advent of digital archiving, which really began to proliferate in the 21st century, most information provided through the Government Printing Office (the folks we work with in obtain government documents) is available online.

Recently, the Library of Congress, likely spurred on by the enormous popularity of the hit Broadway musical, “Hamilton,” has digitized many of the papers of Alexander Hamilton, first treasury secretary of the United States. The collection includes over 12,000 items dating from 1708 to 1917 (although not the Federalist essays). Learn more about and gain access to the collection at: https://www.loc.gov/collections/alexander-hamilton-papers/about-this-collection/

The GPO has begun a retrospective digitization of the bound volumes of the Congressional Record, most recently releasing the 1950s, 1940s & 1930s in digital format. The Congressional Record is the official organ of Congress which is a verbatim transcript of everything that occurs on the House & Senate floors (and has existed in some form since the advent of the first Congressional Congress in 1789). Needless to say, this provides for a vitally rich historical record. Here is some of what you can find at your fingertips at: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/collection/crecb

1951-1960 (82nd thru 86th Congresses):

  • The final two years of President Harry Truman’s Administration
  • President Dwight Eisenhower’s Administration
  • The Korean War
  • The Cold War
  • The creation of NASA
  • Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956

1941-1950 (77th thru 81st Congresses):

  • World War II, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous “day that will live in infamy” address to Congress requesting a declaration of war against Japan
  • VE and VJ Days
  • Demobilization
  • The Franklin Roosevelt Presidency through April 1945 and the Presidency of Harry Truman through 1950
  • The Marshall Plan
  • The beginning of the Cold War

1931-1940 (72nd thru 76th Congresses):

  • The Great Depression.
  • The last two years of the Herbert Hoover Administration and the elections of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, 1936, and 1940.
  • The 21st Amendment (ending Prohibition).
  • The New Deal (Emergency Banking Act, Civilian Conservation Corps, Tennessee Valley Authority Act, Glass-Steagall Act, National Industrial Recovery Act, Wagner Act, Social Security Act, Rural Electrification Act, etc.).
  • Senator Huey Long.
  • FDR’s court-packing plan.
  • The various Neutrality Acts, Lend Lease, and the beginning of World War II.

NOTE: to make the best use of the Congressional Record you will need the dates that discussions occurred on the floor:

If you would like to further explore government documents and information and how they might be of value to your teaching or scholarship, please contact Pamela M. Salela, the UIS liaison to Government Information. You can find her contact info on the government Information research guide at: https://libguides.uis.edu/docs

The Library Bill of Rights, Article V

Over a 7 week period, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. 

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

___________________________________________________________________

WEEK 5

Article V.  A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

In many ways, libraries are the great equalizer. No matter your educational background, your age, your beliefs, or any other aspect of your identity, libraries are open to all, so that all may obtain the resources they need. Creating and maintaining diverse collections, providing unfiltered access to the Internet, and making costly subscription-based online resources available is our foundation. But these collections and services would be meaningless if we limited access to select groups of people. For that reason, I find article 5 of the Library Bill of Rights to be the most impactful.

As an academic library serving a campus community, our primary focus is the university’s student, staff, and faculty. But our resources and services are not limited to those populations. Our doors are open to all. Research is not exclusively done by those with access to a college education. Using computers and the internet are more increasingly the only way to participate in certain basic functions of daily life, and information literacy is not a skill just for the classroom, but for life. Serving Springfield and beyond is an important part of our job.

This openness extends beyond serving patrons who are not affiliated with our university, but has a much broader scope. Brookens, like all libraries adhering to the Library Bill of Rights, places no limitations on patrons based on their origin, age, background, or views. Just like we make both sides of the issue available in our collections, we make that collection available to those with beliefs on either side of the issue, as well as those in-between and undecided. Additionally, we make no assumptions about what people of particular groups will want or need when providing resources. Instead, deciding what resources are appropriate or of interest is entirely up to each individual to decide, and they will be able to do so without censorship or judgment.

It is our honor to serve our UIS community as well as the community at-large and our responsibility to continue to advocate for their right to access the information all of our patrons need or desire.

Written By: Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services

The Library Bill of Rights: Article lll

Over a 7 week period, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. This week we are featuring Article lll.

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

_________________________________________________________________________

Library Bill or Rights, Article IlI.

Written by: Steven Ward, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor/ Visiting User Services and Instructional Services Librarian

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

While all articles contained within in the library Bill of Rights deal with issues of intellectual freedom, the third article speaks more specifically to the responsibility of libraries and librarians to provide access to information of all types, and to challenge attempts of censorship when and where they exist. The limiting of access to information deemed too controversial because it runs contrary to the beliefs or opinions of either a single person, or to a group of people, have had some success through censorship, and although the intentions are often only meant to protect a few, they instead work to threaten all who actively pursue enlightenment and knowledge. Librarians must remain active on the front lines of censorship challenges to ensure that intellectual freedom can be preserved for all.

Even though attempts at censoring information and preventing enlightenment are most prevalent in public and school libraries, academic librarians must still actively contribute to the overall conversation, help to support the cause, and always be ready to defend the intellectual and academic freedom of others should challenges arise. Historically, materials that contained offensive language, were sexually explicit, or were ideological in nature, were targets of the censor, but other materials have been targeted simply because the ideas or subject matter put forward was more forward thinking and progressive than what was traditionally accepted at the time. When looking at banned books lists specifically, which provide some evidence of cases of censorship existing in libraries across the United States, it is most often these very materials that eventually gain wide acceptance for both helping to bring about social change, and for helping to shape the course of history. As a librarian, the idea that someone would choose to censor information or ban books was quite surprising to me at first, but after better understanding the responsibility we have in serving our community, as well as the negative implications that such bans can have on intellectual freedom rights, I am committed to ensuring that access to information of all types, controversial or not, is available to all who wish to seek it.

One way to stay informed and to help challenge censorship in libraries, is to celebrate ALA’s “Banned Books Week”. By promoting both successful and unsuccessful cases of banned and challenged books, ALA provides an awareness that allows libraries and librarians to engage the public in a discussion that can only help to highlight the importance of intellectual freedom and the right to read. This year’s event will take place the week of Sept 24th through Sept 30th. I am linking the site below, and I encourage you to browse the various banned books lists and literature found on this page.

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/

Steven Ward, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor/ Visiting User Services and Instructional Services Librarian

The Library Bill of Rights: Article ll

Over the next 7 weeks, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. This week we are featuring Article ll.

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

_________________________________________________________________________

Library Bill or Rights, Article II.

Written by: Stephen McMinn, Director of Collections & Scholarly Communications

ll: Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

The library Bill of Rights consists of six statements deigned to help define the role of the library and serve as guiding principles for the services they provide. The preamble so to speak, plainly states “that all libraries are forums for information and ideas.” The second of the six articles in the Library Bill of Rights is most closely aligned to the First Amendment to the US Constitution which protects the rights of free speech and that of a free press. This article is written in two parts, the first statement covering the acquisition of all types or viewpoints of information, and the second part opposing removal of information due to the objection of others. This article states, “Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues, and materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.” Essentially, it states that all types of information should be included or made available such that people can explore all sides of an issue, topic, or area of study.

Many of the articles in the Library Bill of Rights are similar or related to the overall goal of providing access to information and ideas with subtle differences. One could question how this statement is different than the first article or the next article dealing with censorship. The subtle difference from the first article is this article is centered on content of the information collected whereas the 1st article is more focused on who created the content. In terms of censorship, this statement is more specific as it opposes removing items from the library because they do not fit their individual beliefs or world view as opposed to taking a stand against censorship which is the government trying to keep out ideas or information. In my view, these guiding principles are important to a healthy and vibrant society as understanding other people’s beliefs, cultures, and views leads to better understanding and empathy. However, taking these positions just like free speech is difficult and can lead to misunderstandings of the library’s role in providing a forum for information and ideas.

One of my favorite lines that describes the issues with holding these beliefs is from the movie, An American President, where the president states “America is advanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, ’cause it’s gonna put up a fight. It’s gonna say “You want free speech? Let’s see you acknowledge a man whose words make your blood boil, who’s standing center stage and advocating at the top of his lungs that which you would spend a lifetime opposing at the top of yours.” It’s easy when everyone agrees with you, it’s difficult when peoples’ strongly held beliefs go against yours, but hopefully the role of the library in presenting all types of information with all types of ideas and viewpoints, can foster understanding which will ultimately bring people together, not pull them apart.

Stephen McMinn, Director of Collections & Scholarly Communications

 

 

 

 

Faculty Library Associate 2017

Brookens Library is pleased to announce our 4th Summer Faculty Library Associate program. Designed to create intensive collaboration between faculty and the library, this program asks faculty to further integrate information literacy into new or existing courses. Embedding information literacy learning objectives into your curriculum through instruction, activities, and teaching materials improves student-learning outcomes and provides students with life-long skills that help them conduct better research and be better consumers of information.

Working one-on-one with a librarian, our program allows you to dive deep into your course curriculum. To do so, the selected associate will devote the equivalent of 5 hours a week during the 8 week summer session, and for this work will be awarded a $1500 stipend.

Past associates have revamped research assignments, created online tutorials, created new assignments, embedded information literacy instruction, and assessed student learning. There are many ways to approach this opportunity, and your library liaison is available to talk with you about your courses and ideas as you consider your application. Additionally, you may find the Framework For Information Literacy for Higher Education as good inspiration. This document serves as the foundation from which we create learning objectives when designing information literacy instruction and teaching materials.

For a full list of expectation and application requirements visit our Faculty Resources guide. Applications are due April 14, 2017 to Sarah Sagmoen at sarah.sagmoen@uis.edu