2017 Faculty Library Associates

We are please to announce this year’s summer Library Faculty Associates.  Each summer, a faculty member is selected to work one-one-one with their library liaison to further incorporate information literacy into their curriculum.  This year, like the first year, we are able to support three associates instead of one.  Please join us in congratulating this year’s associates.  

Brandon Derman from Environmental Studies

Dathan Powell from Theater

Frances Shen from Psychology

We look forward to working with these faculty members, and sharing our work with the campus next year.

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Faculty Library Associate Program: Extended Deadline

We have extended our deadline for submissions.

Applications are due Friday, April 14, 2017 for the 4th Summer Faculty Library Associate program.

Designed to create intensive collaboration between faculty and the library, this program asks faculty to further integrate information literacy into new or existing courses. Embedding information literacy learning objectives into your curriculum through instruction, activities, and teaching materials improves student-learning outcomes and provides students with life-long skills that help them conduct better research and be better consumers of information.

Working one-on-one with a librarian, our program allows you to dive deep into your course curriculum. To do so, the selected associate will devote the equivalent of 5 hours a week during the 8 week summer session, and for this work will be awarded a $1500 stipend.

Past associates have revamped research assignments, created online tutorials, created new assignments, embedded information literacy instruction, and assessed student learning. There are many ways to approach this opportunity, and your library liaison is available to talk with you about your courses and ideas as you consider your application. Additionally, you may find the Framework For Information Literacy for Higher Education as good inspiration. This document serves as the foundation from which we create learning objectives when designing information literacy instruction and teaching materials.

For a full list of expectation and application requirements visit our Faculty Resources guide. Applications are due April 14, 2017 to Sarah Sagmoen at sarah.sagmoen@uis.edu

The Library Bill of Rights, Article V

Over a 7 week period, the Faculty at Brookens Library will be sharing a blog series expounding on each article of the Library Bill of Rights. Each of the 6 principles in the Library Bill of Rights broadly outlines an ideal that librarians support and upon which they model behavior, practice, and services. As with most ideals, pursuit of the tenets of the Library Bill of Rights is not an effortless task. Each of the points we’ll be discussing come with their own special challenges and obstacles. 

The Library Bill of Rights (LBR), or as it was originally named, Library’s Bill of Rights, of the American Library Association “serves as the library profession’s interpretation of how the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution applies to libraries” (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, p. xix). Specifically related to the First Amendment, the LBR interprets how “the freedom of speech, or of the press” applies to library practices. The ALA interprets these freedoms broadly to include intellectual freedom, “a freedom of the mind, a personal liberty and a prerequisite for all freedoms [End Page 42] leading to action.” Intellectual freedom is “the bulwark of our constitutional republic . . . [and] . . . the rallying cry of those who struggle for democracy worldwide,” according to the ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Manual, the official interpretive document and guide on implementing the LBR within the context of US libraries (Office for Intellectual Freedom, 2010, pp. xvii–xviii). (Reexamining the Origins of the Adoption of the ALA’s Library Bill of Rights, p. 1)

The Library Bill of Rights:

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 19, 1939, by the ALA Council; amended October 14, 1944; June 18, 1948; February 2, 1961; June 27, 1967; January 23, 1980; inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996.

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WEEK 5

Article V.  A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

In many ways, libraries are the great equalizer. No matter your educational background, your age, your beliefs, or any other aspect of your identity, libraries are open to all, so that all may obtain the resources they need. Creating and maintaining diverse collections, providing unfiltered access to the Internet, and making costly subscription-based online resources available is our foundation. But these collections and services would be meaningless if we limited access to select groups of people. For that reason, I find article 5 of the Library Bill of Rights to be the most impactful.

As an academic library serving a campus community, our primary focus is the university’s student, staff, and faculty. But our resources and services are not limited to those populations. Our doors are open to all. Research is not exclusively done by those with access to a college education. Using computers and the internet are more increasingly the only way to participate in certain basic functions of daily life, and information literacy is not a skill just for the classroom, but for life. Serving Springfield and beyond is an important part of our job.

This openness extends beyond serving patrons who are not affiliated with our university, but has a much broader scope. Brookens, like all libraries adhering to the Library Bill of Rights, places no limitations on patrons based on their origin, age, background, or views. Just like we make both sides of the issue available in our collections, we make that collection available to those with beliefs on either side of the issue, as well as those in-between and undecided. Additionally, we make no assumptions about what people of particular groups will want or need when providing resources. Instead, deciding what resources are appropriate or of interest is entirely up to each individual to decide, and they will be able to do so without censorship or judgment.

It is our honor to serve our UIS community as well as the community at-large and our responsibility to continue to advocate for their right to access the information all of our patrons need or desire.

Written By: Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services

Faculty Library Associate 2017

Brookens Library is pleased to announce our 4th Summer Faculty Library Associate program. Designed to create intensive collaboration between faculty and the library, this program asks faculty to further integrate information literacy into new or existing courses. Embedding information literacy learning objectives into your curriculum through instruction, activities, and teaching materials improves student-learning outcomes and provides students with life-long skills that help them conduct better research and be better consumers of information.

Working one-on-one with a librarian, our program allows you to dive deep into your course curriculum. To do so, the selected associate will devote the equivalent of 5 hours a week during the 8 week summer session, and for this work will be awarded a $1500 stipend.

Past associates have revamped research assignments, created online tutorials, created new assignments, embedded information literacy instruction, and assessed student learning. There are many ways to approach this opportunity, and your library liaison is available to talk with you about your courses and ideas as you consider your application. Additionally, you may find the Framework For Information Literacy for Higher Education as good inspiration. This document serves as the foundation from which we create learning objectives when designing information literacy instruction and teaching materials.

For a full list of expectation and application requirements visit our Faculty Resources guide. Applications are due April 14, 2017 to Sarah Sagmoen at sarah.sagmoen@uis.edu

 

Week Two Welcome

Welcome Back!  We hope you had a relaxing winter break. As we enter week 2, we hope that your semester is off to a great start. If you have not done so already, we hope that you’ll reach out to your library liaison should you need materials or instruction for your courses.  Sometimes, a course plan has to change, and should you find that you need materials or instruction later this semester, no worries, we’ll be here then as well. We’re here to help, both at the beginning of the semester, and throughout.  We hope you have an excellent spring semester!

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