Hello Faculty!

Featured

Welcome to the Brookens Library at the University of Illinois Springfield Faculty Focus Blog. Here you will find important information specifically for faculty members on the campus of UIS. You can expect information about resources and services, updates to our website, copyright compliance and much more. Subscribe today and stay connected!

CINRC Workshops Spring 2015

This spring semester the Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center at Brookens Library is hosting 11 workshops. Please feel free to share with those you think may benefit. All of the workshops are free of charge and are open to the public.

Locating Private Foundation Funding: Pamela M. Salela, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center

Thursday, February 5; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library:  This workshop will include a demonstration of the specialized database, Foundation Directory Online Professional along with an introduction on what to consider when seeking private foundation monies. You’ll know where to locate the Foundation Center’s online tutorials and Web streams. We’ll also include discussion of tips about proposal writing and communicating with the foundations. Due to limited seating and resources, registration is required. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/3008254

 

Loud & Clear: Low-cost, high-impact marketing for small and mid-sized nonprofits: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, February 10; 1-2:30PM; UIS Brookens Library:  As non-profits compete for public support, financial resources, and even volunteers, any chance to tell your organization’s story and boost your visibility is an opportunity to engage the community with your cause, build buy-in, attract supporters, and draw in clients and customers. From the elevator to the evening news, marketing and public relations play a critical role in helping advance your organization’s mission. This session is geared toward staff, volunteers, and board members who want to learn great low-cost, high-impact marketing and public relations ideas and find out what works and what doesn’t in telling your story. Learn to identify ideal target audiences, great storytelling techniques to grab attention, how people actually listen and learn, effective low-cost techniques to reach new and existing audiences, and how each person in your organization can make a difference. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/5609483

 

Getting Grassroots Gifts: The lifeblood of a healthy nonprofit: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, February 10; 3:30-5PM; UIS Brookens Library:  In this session, attendees will learn how to effectively raise money from people. With nearly 80% of charitable dollars coming from individuals (compared to 15% from grants), it is critically important for nonprofits of all sizes to develop a strong, sustainable, and thriving grassroots giving program. From $20 donors to annual givers to major gifts, learn the not-so-secret secrets of how and why people give, how and when to ask them, and other useful tips. This session is most helpful when taken hand-in-hand with “Loud & Clear: Low-cost, high-impact marketing for small and mid-sized nonprofits” on just prior to this session on from 1-2:30PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/6032270.  Great follow ups to this session also include “Creating Amazing Special Events” (February 18; 10-11:30AM) and “Show-Stopping Fundraising Appeal Letters”(February 18; 10-11:30AM).

 

Creating Amazing Special Events of All Types: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 18; 10-11:30AM; Lincoln Public Library:  If you think about all the events you’ve attended over the years, there are those you remember and look forward to attending, and those you would prefer to forget (and perhaps even left early from). Creating those memorable events packed with amazing results is hard work, especially if event planning isn’t your forte. At this workshop, discover the inside tips, techniques, and tricks of pulling off flawless events, developing the confidence you need to pull everything off like a pro. From staff retreats to annual dinners to volunteer gatherings to major conferences, you’ll learn to anticipate needs and details, plan for the worst, and see the nuts and bolts needed behind-the-scenes and front stage to create well-run professional gatherings. A helpful session to take in conjunction with this workshop is “Getting Grassroots Gifts: The lifeblood of a healthy nonprofit” on Tuesday, February 10 from 3:30-5PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/5763225

 

Show-stopping Fundraising Appeal Letters: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 18; 1-2:30PM; Lincoln Public Library:  With mailboxes filled with advertising slicks, junk mail, and endless appeals for money, it might seem an impossible task to get your fundraising letter to be the first things your supporters open. But it’s easier than you think. In this session, learn the tried-and-true techniques of preparing fundraising appeal letters that your supporters will not be able to resist. Start moving your reply rates from 1-2% up to 10-20% and see donations – and donation amount – rise. All with a few easy techniques, a bit of elbow grease, and a long-term vision. A helpful session to take in conjunction with this workshop is “Getting Grassroots Gifts: The lifeblood of a healthy nonprofit” on February 10 from 3:30-5PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/6020918

 

Planning to Succeed: The Nuts & Bolts of Strategic and Organizational Plans: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 25; 10-11:30AM; Lincoln Public Library:  Strategic and organizational planning is critically important to the success of any nonprofit – and to engaging broad organizational audiences. But it’s hard to do well, and many groups suffer from outdated, dusty, boring or confusing – or even nonexistent – plans. In this session, you’ll learn the nuts and bolts of solid strategic plans – a structure that can (and should) be used to develop development plans, communications plans, and program plans. While we won’t be creating any plans in this session (these are organization-wide processes), you’ll learn what steps you need to take to create real, living documents, and what truly meaningful and engaging plans look like (and how they can transform your organization’s operations). Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/9935008

 

Metrics, KPI, and Statistics, oh my! Measuring – and sharing – what matters in nonprofits: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Wednesday, February 25; 1-2:30PM; Lincoln Public Library:  Today the value and use of evaluation and metrics to nonprofit organizations has never been more important – or required. From mandated use of various forms for accountability to donor-driven transparency to volunteer program efficiency, understanding and keeping evaluation and benchmarking statistics and tools is now a non-negotiable part of running a top-shelf nonprofit. But while most nonprofits get high marks in delivering value, we easily get lost in numbers, floating amidst the sea of data available for us to measure and share. In this workshop, learn to stay competitive and compliant, demonstrate the value of your work, and report outcomes in ways that engage and excite donors, funders, elected officials, and other constituencies.  Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/2158539

 

I’m No Dummy: But can someone show me how Facebook really works?: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, March 3; 1-2:30PM; UIS Brookens Library:  People love it or hate it. In today’s age, the importance of Facebook to nonprofits cannot be overstated. Done right, Facebook can help put your group on the proverbial map. Done wrong, it can stagnate and leave your group looking backwards and behind-the-times. In this 1.5 hour hands-on, interactive workshop conducted in a computer lab, learn the latest tricks and tips for using personal and organizational Facebook pages to maximize impact. Learn to invigorate board, staff, public, and client engagement, and learn how to use ads, Facebook insights, and best settings to increase engagement while protecting your interests. A great pairing to this workshop is “WWW: What does your website really say about your organization?” held later this same day from 3:30-5PM. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/8094718

 

WWW: What does your website really say about your organization?: Laura Huth, do good Consulting

Tuesday, March 3; 3:30-5PM; UIS Brookens Library:  Does your website build relationships? Engage donors? Excite volunteers? Assist clients? Does it really? In this hands-on, interactive workshop conducted in a computer lab, we’ll take a critical look at your website against best practices, analyzing it top-to-bottom for clarity, image, and ranking. We’ll dig deep, looking at navigation, accessibility, SEO, keywords, and take a serious look at content.

In today’s digital world the content on our websites (and/or Facebook) is often the first, and possibly the only, communication we have with our visitors. It’s important that your website make the cut – or even be a cut above. In this session, we’ll be acting as our own customers – donors, volunteers, clients, media, and others – to see how they see us on the web, determining what changes to make to increase effectiveness. A helpful session to take in conjunction with this workshop is “I’m No Dummy: But can someone show me how Facebook really works?” earlier this day from 1-2:30PM.   Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/6682138

 

Locating Private Foundation Funding: Pamela M. Salela, Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center

Thursday, March 12; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library:  This workshop will include a demonstration of the specialized database, Foundation Directory Online Professional along with an introduction on what to consider when seeking private foundation monies. You’ll know where to locate the Foundation Center’s online tutorials and Web streams. We’ll also include discussion of tips about proposal writing and communicating with the foundations. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/7937717

 

Community Health & Socioeconomic Data at Your Fingertips: Paula Gramley, Community Benefits Coordinator, Memorial Health System

Thursday, April 9; 1-3PM; UIS Brookens Library:  The workshop will provide an introduction to a free online database at www.choosememorial.org/healthycommunities. This site provides community demographics and rankings of more than 100 health and socioeconomic indicators for Sangamon, Logan, Morgan and Christian counties.  Information is updated regularly so that the data is the latest available. Community data is available in seven categories: health, economy, education, environment, public safety, social environment and transportation. This data may help organizations with goal setting, need assessments, grant writing and other work. Workshop includes hands on component at computer. Registration: https://uofi.uis.edu/fb/sec/4755484

 

 

Welcome Back Faculty

As we welcome students back to campus, your librarians are gearing up for a semester full of instruction, orientations and other events.

Do your students need a refresher on what Brookens Library offers? If so, send them on a Library Tour! We’ve scheduled both on-campus Tours and online Virtual Tours for Spring semester. The Tour covers where to find books and articles, how to access resources from off-campus, where to get research help, and more! See the Brookens Library calendar for dates and times.

If you would like a tour or other library instruction during class time, contact your library liaison to schedule. (We do online instruction, too.)

Your library liaison can provide library instruction to your classes and one-on-one research consultations to you and your students. The librarians have created online Research Guides for every major which can be accessed through the automatically provided link in your course Black Board. Video and interactive tutorials covering a wide range of skills and concepts are available for your use; embed in Black Board, or assign to students outside of class. Please contact your liaison to discuss ways to incorporate library instruction and resources into your courses.

The library has several resources especially for faculty: a Faculty Resource page which contains policies, procedures and other information, this Faculty Focus blog, and an email newsletter to keep you up-to-date on library resources and events. Librarians are always happy to attend, by invitation, your department’s faculty meetings.

Remember that we can also order materials for the library collection; just send requests to your liaison.

Brookens Library and the Library Instructional Services Program look forward to working with you and your students this semester. See you in the library!

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Sarah Sagmoen

Movers2014webBigSagmoenb Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Sarah Sagmoen

Photo by Janelle Gurnsey

 

In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Sarah Sagmoen, learning commons and user services librarian at the University of Illinois Springfield’s Brookens Library. Hired as a visiting instructional librarian in 2009, Sagmoen was managing the reference desk and public computers by the end of her first year. In her third year at Brookens, her work inspired the library to create the position she now occupies. Between her academic duties and a lively student outreach program, she is busy building a strong community both inside the library and out.

LJ: How did you jump into a job at an academic library straight out of library school?

Sarah Sagmoen: This was my first full-time librarian position. I was hired for a ten-month visiting position only. I looked at it as an opportunity to get my foot in the door, so mostly my focus was on getting as much experience as I could. And then I never left! We ended up being put into a hiring freeze, so the few of us who were hired on in visiting positions were allowed to get a second, and in my case a third, visiting contract.

In this interview series, sponsored by SAGELJ goes in depth with this year’s Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, delving into just how and why they pulled off the projects that brought them recognition as innovators, change agents, and more.

You wear a lot of different hats within the library and on campus, and you manage it all well. How do you prioritize everything so successfully?

I’m glad it looks that way! For me, it’s about just knowing that if I come to work and I’m productive all day, some days that’s the best I can do. It might not be what I intended to be productive on, but so long as I’ve taken advantage of the day to the best of my abilities, I just have to be happy with that.

Before I leave at the end of the day I make a to-do list for myself for the next day that has a variety of short, quick things I can do. That way if I find myself with ten to 15 minutes here and there I have a couple of little tasks I can knock out, whereas otherwise those little gaps can get wasted because you look at them and think ”that’s not enough time to get anything done.”

Also, it’s so important to take lunch. Get out of your office and don’t eat at your desk!

What projects do you have going on right now?

Right now we’re in the midst of a large project we started in summer [2013], where we completely revamped our student employment model. Previously we looked at student employees as a benefit for the library—they help us keep our doors open, they staff our major desks—and we turned it around to make it an opportunity for us to really teach them some things. We created two student manager positions, and we created a three-tiered circulation training module to train them to do basic reference. We’ve empowered them quite a bit and we expect more out of them. It’s exciting to see students taking on much more responsibility than they previously had, and the skills we’re teaching them are making them better students. They’re learning how to do research better to help other students at the desk, but they also take it back into the classroom.

You participated in the most recent Knight News Challenge for libraries—how was that experience?

I enjoyed it a lot. We’re in desperate need of a larger, more sophisticated classroom in our library. Our classroom only seats 20-25 comfortably and it’s not a lab—there are no computers, other than the computer and projector in the front, and it’s just not working for us. It seemed like a good opportunity for me to really work through how we would go about acquiring a classroom of the size we would need, and think about what technology we would need, what the process would be—because I work for the state we have to work with state contracts, and I can’t just work with any company I want to. I spent a day in my office and hung Post-it notes all over the walls and brainstormed.

Even [though my proposal wasn’t] selected, it was a good activity for me because we’re actually going to put some of those plans in place, at least the initial stages of allocating the funding. It was fun, and I feel that any time you’re forced to do something like that it’s useful. It’s like conference proposals—even if your proposal doesn’t get submitted it’s a nice activity to work through what you’re doing and why you’re doing it, and whether or not it’s working. We don’t often reflect enough critically about what we do because we’re all just so busy.

How do you feel about the literacy skills in the students you teach?

That’s an interesting question because yesterday I and two of my colleagues did a faculty development session entitled “Getting Better Research from Your Students.” It was geared to the idea that the expectations college professors have aren’t matching what our freshmen are coming in with—due to a lot of factors, but mostly because school libraries are getting cut across the nation. There’s this expectation that college freshmen understand the difference, for example, between a scholarly and a popular journal. But they just don’t. It’s not any fault of the students’, it’s that the system has failed them in this way. We were presenting yesterday about creating better research assignment handouts to help students bridge that gap.

Who are the mentors who made a difference for you?

I have a really supportive group here, but most importantly, I work for a boss, Jane Treadwell, who’s very supportive of me—just having that person I know I can ask for quick advice on little things or big things, and also the knowledge that I don’t have to check everything with her. She trusts what I do, she trusts my decisions. I’ve been empowered from day one as very young, new librarian. She’s been more than instrumental in my career at this point.

What changes would you like to see at your library?

A chunk of my job is redesigning and managing the spaces within the library, and I would like to see better funding so we can get this [renovation] that we so desperately need—from little things like not enough outlets to bringing in technology and collaborative spaces, being prepared to serve our ever-growing population. I’d like to see us build that classroom so that we can really show what we do on a much larger scale—I think it would have a big impact on our campus. It would certainly have a big impact on us here within the building. It would be a good way to refresh and get excited about little things again. When you’re doing instruction in a new, cool space, it helps you imagine larger, cooler, more meaningful activities.

What would you tell someone starting out who wants to be a library leader?

I would say follow your passion. It’s more likely that you’re going to find something awesome to do if you’re passionate about it. Too often people think that those things have to be flashy or outside of the box. But they don’t have to be—they just have to be something you feel very strongly about, whether it’s helping incoming freshmen bridge that gap through information literacy, or creating collaborations outside your library building. That’s the thing that I’ve found I’m really passionate about, and that I just kind of fell into. I had a teaching background and I came in thinking that instruction was going to be my thing, and it wasn’t. I still love being in the classroom and doing instruction but I don’t do tons of it, or at least not as much as I used to, because I’ve moved into the outreach/partnership area. This opportunity fell in my lap and I took advantage of it.

As young librarians, so often we’re told we have to have these five-year plans, but the reality is you just don’t know what’s coming down the pipeline. Keep your eyes and ears open, and if something that you think is cool—or that you’re excited about—happens in front of you, take advantage of it, just roll with it and see where it goes. (This article was taken from Library Journal).

This article was featured in Library Journal‘s Academic Newswire enewsletter.  See the original article.

Event: Using EndNote Web 11/19 at Noon

Using EndNote Web to Create Bibliographies and Organize Your Research

November 19th at noon in room 141B – Brookens Library

EndNote Web the web version of the popular but expensive bibliographic management application, EndNote, is freely available to all UIS faculty and students due to the library’s subscription to Thomson databases.  This session will provide an overview of the features of this application as well as how to use it to organize your literature and create bibliographies.

Event: Bibliographic Management Tools 11/19 at 11am

Bibliographic Management Tools – What They Are, What They Do, and Finding the Right One for You.

November 19th at 11 am in Room 141B – Brookens Library.

Bibliographic Management Tools such as EndNote and Zotero can help you organize your research and help save time in your writing by easing the burden of citing references and building bibliographies.  Come learn how these applications work, what they can do, and find the one that best fits your specific need.   Are they worth the cost  or will one of the several free applications meet your needs.

My ILL Account Down Wed. 11/19

My ILL Account & Service will be unavailable on Wednesday, November 19th between 7:00 am – 1:00 pm for scheduled maintenance.

How this may impact you:

– You will not be able to request books or articles through InterLibrary Loan during that period. Please note that IShare will not be affected.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

FDO: “Getting Better Research from Your Students”

Brookens Faculty Development Workshop

“Getting Better Research from Your Students”

Are you tired of your students turning in papers and projects having cited sub-par resources?  Have no fear, the librarians are here!  This session will begin with discussion about the expectations and realities of student research skills in higher education.  We will then give you ideas to create or revise assignments that teach both search and source evaluation skills, improving the quality of student research.

Cookies and beverages will be provided!  Feel free to bring your lunch.

Presenters:    Dorothy Ryan, Clinical Assistant Professor/Instructional Services Librarian; Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services; Nancy Weichert, Clinical Assistant Professor/Instructional Services Librarian.

Date/Time/Location: Tuesday, Nov. 11, 11 – 12:00 p.m., PAC Conference Rm G

Open Access & Libraries

We invite you to join us for a free webinar on Open Access, “Open Access & Libraries”, this Thursday, November 6 at 1:00 p.m. in the Brookens Library Classroom (BRK 232). Here you will learn about what Open Access is (and isn’t) and more.

Open Access in Libraries

Scholarly journals are increasingly becoming digital, experimenting with new publishing models such as Open Access (OA) and incorporating multimedia into their formats. In addition, the process of research continues to evolve because of mandates from funding agencies to publicly share research findings and data. For a candid discussion of what OA is (and isn’t), tune in Thursday, November 6 at 1:00 p.m. (Central) for the next free, streaming video broadcast of American Libraries Live.

The panel of experts will give their unique perspective on what OA means now and how it will shape the future and will answer your questions.

Open Access Week at Brookens

Brookens Library is celebrating Open Access Week (October 20th  – 26th) with two events on Thursday, October 23rd  in Brookens 141A.
The first is an “Update on Open Access at UIS” presented by Stephen McMinn, Director of Scholarly Communications at 11:00 am followed by a Webinar at Noon presented by Ebsco entitled “The Feedback Loop Between Open Access & Altmetrics.”

The session, “Update on Open Access at UIS” will provide an introduction to open access and why it is important. It will also include an update on the universities response to the Open Access to Research Articles Act.

A brief description of the webinar, “The Feedback Loop Between Open Access & Altmetrics”, starting at Noon is as follows:

In recent years mandates for researchers to publish their research – both articles and data – openly are growing. Yet, mandates do not always work; researchers still do not do this. Altmetrics, and the information about how people are interacting with research, can provide the feedback loop needed to help motivate people to publish openly. In this one-hour webinar, Mike Showalter of Plum Analytics will describe and demonstrate altmetrics and open access and you will learn about the capabilities of using altmetrics as your own open access feedback loop.

Please join us for either event celebrating Open Access Week!

Getting Better Research from Your Students

Fall 2014 FDO Workshop

“Getting Better Research from Your Students”

 Are you tired of your students turning in papers and projects having cited sub-par resources?  Have no fear, the librarians are here!  This session will begin with discussion about the expectations and realities of student research skills in higher education.  We will then give you ideas to create or revise assignments that teach both search and source evaluation skills, improving the quality of student research.

Cookies and beverages will be provided!  Feel free to bring your lunch.

Presenters:    Sarah Sagmoen, Director of Learning Commons and User Services; Nancy Weichert, Clinical Assistant Professor/Instructional Services Librarian; Dorothy Ryan, Clinical Assistant Professor/Instructional Services Librarian

Date/Time/Location: Tuesday, Nov. 11, 11 – 12:00 p.m., PAC Conference Rm G