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Jackie Jackson Exhibit at Brookens

Jackie Jackson with some of her life’s work boxed to go to the UIS archive. Photo credit: Illinois Times

UIS Professor Emerita of English and Women’s Studies, Jackie Jackson, was featured in a cover story in the November 2, 2017 issue of Illinois Times. To celebrate this honor, UIS Archives/Special Collections has created an exhibit about Jackson on Level 2 of Brookens Library.

Jacqueline Dougan Jackson was born near Beloit, Wisconsin and was raised on her family’s dairy farm.  She graduated from the University of Beloit in 1950, and received an M.A. in Latin from the University of Michigan in 1951. After teaching writing at Kent State University, in 1970 she was hired as a charter faculty member at a new university in Springfield, Illinois, named Sangamon State University (now UIS). She taught at UIS until her retirement in 2000, but, at age 89,  she still teaches writing in her home.

The exhibit includes copies of Jackson’s published books dating back to 1953.  Jackie published several children’s book, but also the Stories from the Round Barn series,  which includes her delightful and thoughtful reminiscences of her early years growing up on a dairy farm, and her remarkable family. The final volume of the Stories from the Round Barn series has just been published, and is the occasion for the Illinois Times feature article.

The exhibit also contains material from the Reading and Writing and Radio Jamboree, organized and directed by Jackie Jackson. Every spring from 1975 to 1993, hundreds of central Illinois schoolchildren converged on the SSU campus for the Jamboree, a festive occasion for students, second grade to high school, to come together and share and present essays on a variety of subjects, both serious and lighthearted. Selected essays would be read and broadcast on the campus radio station.

New Resources for Students and Researchers

The library recently added a number of new resources that are available for students and researchers alike. There is something new for everyone; books, newspapers, primary source materials, and statistical sources. Besides the new popular collections on the main floor of the library, the library added thousands of new academic resources and tools.

In terms of size the largest number of new items are ebooks through the Springer E-book purchase. The library added the entire 2016 and 2017 collection of Springer electronic books containing over 12,000 books mostly in STM fields but with almost 4,000 books in the Behavioral Science and Psychology, Business and Management, Economics and Finance, and Education subject areas.

Newspapers.com provides access to 200+ million pages of historical newspapers from 5,200+ newspapers from around the United States and beyond. This is a great source for history and other disciplines using primary source materials. The drawback is not getting sidetracked by your favorite historical topic (Titanic, Dillinger, or Pearl Harbor) or just looking at the advertisements and other glimpses at the news of the day from the 1800’s onward.

Need data or statistics? The library now has access to both Statistical Insights and Statistical Abstracts of the United States electronically. Statistical Abstract of the United States includes comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States with 1400+ individually indexed tables (with attached spreadsheets).

The reference collection was enhanced with the acquisitions of the Oxford Handbook Series for 2016 and 2017 in most of the social science disciplines. This resources added 74 books or book series containing almost 3,000 articles on almost every social science subject areas from archology to religion.

The library also renewed its access to the computer science books published by MIT Press and accessible on the IEEE Xplore platform. This brings the current total of basic computer science books on the platform to almost 700 books with the addition of 42 books in 2016 and another 28 so far this year.

Also on the IEEE platform the library added two self-paced courses related to security, the IEEE Cyber Security Program and the IEEE Ethical Hacking Program. Each of these contain over ten modules on various aspects of hacking and computer security. The courses have modules on cloud security, data security, mobile device security, cryptography, cyber security countermeasures, and cyber forensics.

Finally, my favorite new tool is the New Oxford Shakespeare which provides both the original text of all of Shakespeare works with helpful note, definition, or whatever you want to call their unique tool of getting from the old English to something even I can understand. Or there is a version of all of these works pre-translated to modern English but still with the helpful notes or translations. This is great for English as well as Theater or anyone who needs help with their Shakespeare.

 

Reminder: Faculty Reception Today at 4:30 pm

Today is the day! Join us for the Brookens Library Faculty Reception from 4:30-6:00 pm TODAY! Your mid-term grades have been submitted, and it’s the perfect time for a mid-week break, so stop by for a glass of wine or beer, and some tasty snacks. We’ll be talking about research opportunities for faculty and students, and we’d love to meet you and hear more about your research and how Brookens Library can meet those needs. Brief remarks begin at 5:00 pm. 

We hope to see you there!

Faculty Reception: October 25

Save the date for October 25th and join Brookens Library for a Faculty Reception from 4:30-6:00 pm. Your mid-term grades have been submitted, and it’s the perfect time for a mid-week break, so stop by for a glass of wine or beer, and some tasty snacks. We’ll be talking about research opportunities for faculty and students, and we’d love to meet you and hear more about your research and how Brookens Library can meet those needs.  

We hope to see you there!

Librarians to Attend ILA Conference

Many of the Brookens librarians will be heading to the Illinois Library Association’s Annual Conference – Rise Up (https://www.ila.org/events/annual-conference) this week, October 10-12. Here’s a glimpse of what they’ll be doing.

Pattie Piotrowski, University Librarian & Dean of Library Instructional Services, serves on the ILA Executive Board in the position of Immediate Past President and serves as the Chair of the ILA Nominating Committee. As Past President, she’ll be part of the trio of emcees at the Awards Luncheon on Tuesday, will be catching up with friends and colleagues at the Academic Librarians Unconference and the Illinois Association of College and Research Libraries (IACRL) luncheon on Wednesday, and will be meeting with members of ILA’s Nominating Committee planning the slate for next year’s elections. She’s also looking forward to attending sessions, visiting the exhibits, and going to social events such as the Pub Stroll.

John Laubersheimer, Instructional Services Librarian, is looking forward to attending an array of sessions. He’s most interested in learning about ideas on improving library assessment practices and will be attending “Interrupting the Research Process: Using Standard Content and Rubrics for Student Success”. Beyond that, he wants to focus on sharing ideas internally with library colleagues and will be attending “Bring the Conference Home: Using the Conference Format for Staff Training and Professional Development” He also serves on the ILA Awards Committee and will be participating in the awards luncheon.

 

Sarah Sagmoen, Instructional Services Librarian & Director of Learning Commons and User Services, is the Co-Chair of the Conference Program Committee. She’s most looking forward to hearing Verna Myers keynote on empowering people of all backgrounds to contribute at their highest levels. Sarah will also be participating on a panel, along with 3 other state university librarians, discussing the impacts of two years of a lack of a state budget. The session is entitled Hard Times: Operating User Services on Short Staff, Short Funds, and Short Hope. The panelists will discuss how labor was redistributed from within departments and elsewhere, along with the effects on service, staff, and morale.

Janelle Gurnsey, Outreach and Communications Coordinator, and Nancy Weichert, Instructional Services Librarian, will be co-presenting on their efforts to engage and connect with students. Their session, Re-Sourcing Your Resources: Working with What You Have to Inspire Creative Engagement, will highlight how they’ve repurposed traditionally discarded materials such as card catalog cards, bookends, and book covers to connect with, inspire, and engage their users in new and exciting ways.

In her role as an ILA Diversity Committee member Nancy will also co-facilitate the ILA Diversity Committee program DiversiTEA where participants will be encouraged to share diversity and inclusion initiatives at their libraries. She will also contribute to the Diversity Report Poster Session, which highlights library programs and services targeting diverse and underserved audiences.

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Mango’s Language Courses

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with Mango’s language courses

 Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15 to recognize the contributions that have been made by Americans with ancestry in Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. Learn about the rich cultural and linguistic diversity present in the United States with Mango, an online language learning resource that faculty, students and staff can access through Brookens Library.

Mango’s language lessons focus on words and phrases that will be valuable in common, real life situations for over 70 different languages. It’s the perfect fit for students with busy schedules or faculty looking for a tool to help supplement a course or topic that is being taught on campus.

Here are a few ways to discover Hispanic cultures this month:

Learn a new language.

 Do you need to brush up on your Spanish or Portuguese? Mango offers Spanish (Latin America), Spanish (Spain), and Portuguese courses that break down lessons into small, bite-sized chunks and gives language learners access to features like voice comparison technology, interactive grammar lessons, and cultural insight tips.

To help you practice Spanish and Portuguese on the go, iPhone and Android apps are available for free download that will link to your Mango account.

Discover Spanish culture.

Mango highlights a variety of cultural traditions through language and grammar lessons. Explore the tradition of flamenco dancing with a Spanish course that talks about the culture of this dance style or learn soccer-specific Castilian Spanish with lessons that teach you how to discuss soccer matches and express your love of the game with your friends.

Enhance real world professional skills.

With foreign language skills being an important asset in the workplace, Mango offers specialty courses that focus on language skills students need for conference calls, texting, and business-related terminology.

Gain the upper hand this month with a new vocabulary of Spanish legal terms and medical terminology.

Watch a foreign language film.

Mango has several feature-length Spanish movies. You can choose to watch the full movie or choose to have interactive lessons that share words and cultural notes about what you see in the film. Watch Viva Cuba for a movie with Romeo and Juliet undertones or Lake Tahoe, which follows the absurd journey of a teenager looking for someone who can help fix his car.

To get started, access Mango’s offerings on the library’s website and create a free profile to get started.

 

This Week at Brookens 9/25 – 9/30

What’s Happening at Brookens This Week!

HOMECOMING WEEK:

This week is Homecoming Week at UIS. We are having several events in conjunction with the spirit filled week.

CINRC 40th Anniversary Celebration:

First, we are celebrating the Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center’s 40thAnniversary of serving non-profits on Thursday, September 28, from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. We will be set up on the main level of Brookens Library near the entrance/exit.

The CINRC has been one of the best-kept secrets in Central Illinois for far too long, and we’re hoping to change that.   Come check out our fresh new look and the many resources we have to offer for nonprofits and researchers alike.

In addition to the CINRC’s outreach to the central Illinois nonprofit community, Director Pamela M. Salela has also provided classroom instruction for Public Administration, Human Services, History, Environmental Studies, and Education – both in person as well as online for our distance students. Indeed, any class that can benefit from knowing more about grant researching could find her instructional services of value.

Come help us celebrate this milestone! Light refreshments will be served.

BOOK SALE THURSDAY:

It has become a UIS tradition to host our annual Book Sale the week of Homecoming. This year, we have moved our sale from Friday to Thursday, September 28, with the goal of reaching more students, faculty and staff! We are also extending our hours for the first time this year. We will be open from 9:00 am – 6:00 pm outside Brookens Library under the overhang. We hope this will allow you more time to stop by, shop, and stock up on some great reads. Prices range from $1 – $3 so you won’t want to miss it. Please plan to pay with cash or check. We are unable to accept credit or iCash.

 MAKERS TAKERS SPIRIT EVENT: During the Book Sale, the Library will be hosting a spirit-week event: “Makers Takers, Make Your Own Spirit Decorations.” At this fun-filled event, you will be able to upcycle library materials into new creations. From bookends to buttons, bunting to bookmarks, we will have something for everyone. Stop by Thursday, September 28 and craft with us from 11:00 – 1:00 pm. We will have tables set up next to the Book Sale underneath the overhang of Brookens Library.

BANNED BOOKS WEEK:

This week is a busy week at Brookens. First, it is Banned Books Week! Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Celebrated September 24- September 30, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

Here are Brookens, we have put together a display, located near the front of the library, featuring some of the banned books from our own collection. Our hope is to support the freedom to read during this week, and throughout the year. Stop by and see what we have on display.

We have also created a Banned Books Week featured list in our free eBook and eAudiobook app Cloud Library. Here you can browse over 19,000 free titles. If you haven’t already downloaded this free app to your device or computer, now would be a great time to get started!

Check out social media channels each day for the Banned Book of the Day. We are on FacebookTwitter and Instagram!

Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week: 9/24 – 9/30

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

To continue to raise awareness about the harms of censorship and the freedom to read, the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) publishes an annual list of the Top Ten Most Challenged Books, using information from public challenges reported in the media, as well as censorship reports submitted to the office through its challenge reporting form.

Find out which books made the Top Ten Most Challenged Books of 2016 and explore Top Ten talking points, infographics and social media art on the Top Ten resource page. View the 2017 State of America’s Library Report for more information on censorship, library trends and research. – ALA

Here are Brookens, we have put together a display, located near the front of the library, featuring some of the banned books from our own collection. Our hope is to support the freedom to read during this week, and throughout the year. Stop by and see what we have on display. 

We have also put together a Banned Books Week featured list in our free eBook and eAudiobook app Cloud Library. Here you can browse over 19,000 free titles. If you haven’t already downloaded this free app to your device or computer, now would be a great time to get started!

UIS a Senate Designated Federal Documents Depository

Did you know that UIS is a Senate designated federal documents depository? Yes, that’s right, we are a selective depository collecting primary source material produced by the U.S. Congress, Legislature and the executive branch as well as other agencies and federal bodies.   Since the advent of digital archiving, which really began to proliferate in the 21st century, most information provided through the Government Printing Office (the folks we work with in obtain government documents) is available online.

Recently, the Library of Congress, likely spurred on by the enormous popularity of the hit Broadway musical, “Hamilton,” has digitized many of the papers of Alexander Hamilton, first treasury secretary of the United States. The collection includes over 12,000 items dating from 1708 to 1917 (although not the Federalist essays). Learn more about and gain access to the collection at: https://www.loc.gov/collections/alexander-hamilton-papers/about-this-collection/

The GPO has begun a retrospective digitization of the bound volumes of the Congressional Record, most recently releasing the 1950s, 1940s & 1930s in digital format. The Congressional Record is the official organ of Congress which is a verbatim transcript of everything that occurs on the House & Senate floors (and has existed in some form since the advent of the first Congressional Congress in 1789). Needless to say, this provides for a vitally rich historical record. Here is some of what you can find at your fingertips at: https://www.govinfo.gov/app/collection/crecb

1951-1960 (82nd thru 86th Congresses):

  • The final two years of President Harry Truman’s Administration
  • President Dwight Eisenhower’s Administration
  • The Korean War
  • The Cold War
  • The creation of NASA
  • Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956

1941-1950 (77th thru 81st Congresses):

  • World War II, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous “day that will live in infamy” address to Congress requesting a declaration of war against Japan
  • VE and VJ Days
  • Demobilization
  • The Franklin Roosevelt Presidency through April 1945 and the Presidency of Harry Truman through 1950
  • The Marshall Plan
  • The beginning of the Cold War

1931-1940 (72nd thru 76th Congresses):

  • The Great Depression.
  • The last two years of the Herbert Hoover Administration and the elections of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, 1936, and 1940.
  • The 21st Amendment (ending Prohibition).
  • The New Deal (Emergency Banking Act, Civilian Conservation Corps, Tennessee Valley Authority Act, Glass-Steagall Act, National Industrial Recovery Act, Wagner Act, Social Security Act, Rural Electrification Act, etc.).
  • Senator Huey Long.
  • FDR’s court-packing plan.
  • The various Neutrality Acts, Lend Lease, and the beginning of World War II.

NOTE: to make the best use of the Congressional Record you will need the dates that discussions occurred on the floor:

If you would like to further explore government documents and information and how they might be of value to your teaching or scholarship, please contact Pamela M. Salela, the UIS liaison to Government Information. You can find her contact info on the government Information research guide at: https://libguides.uis.edu/docs

Alison Flowers, Author of Exoneree Diaries to Speak at UIS June 9

The Friends of Brookens Library at the University of Illinois Springfield have selected Alison Flowers, author of The Exoneree Diaries: The Fight for Innocence, Independence, and Identity, as the guest speaker for the organization’s annual dinner. The dinner portion of the even is for members of the Friends of Brookens Library and the lecture by Flowers is free and open to the public.

John Hanlon, the Executive Director and Legal Director of the Illinois Innocence Project at the University of Illinois Springfield (UIS) will be a special guest at the lecture and will be making remarks.

The event begins at 7:00 pm in the Brookens Auditorium (Lower Level – Brookens Library) on the UIS Campus. A Q/A and book signing will immediately follow.

About The Exoneree Diaries:

Through intimate portraits of four exonerated prisoners, journalist Alison Flowers explores what happens to innocent people after the state flings open the jailhouse door and tosses them back, empty-handed, into the unknown.

From the front lines of the wrongful conviction capital of the United States—Cook County, Illinois—investigative journalist Alison Flowers recounts profoundly human stories of reclaiming life, overcoming adversity, and searching for purpose after exoneration.

As she tells each exoneree’s powerful story, Flowers vividly shows that release from prison, though sometimes joyous and hopeful, is not a Hollywood ending—or an ending at all. Rather, an exoneree’s first unshackled steps are the beginning of a new journey full of turmoil and uncertainty. Flowers also sheds new light on the collateral damage of wrongful convictions on families and communities, confronting deeper problems of mass incarceration and the criminal justice system.

(source)